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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8440
Date: 2018-02-07

Author:Dean Tong

Subject:Re: Child forensic interviews and trauma

Your query could apply to victims who've been abused, but also non-abused victims, too. I don't believe the primary authors (Lamb, Esplin, et al) of the NICHD best practices forensic child interview methodology, or APSAC, or RATAC (Finding Words, Cornerhouse, ChildFirst), et al have studied the traumatic effects of re-victimization from forensic child interviews. Perhaps, this would be an issue that experts in psychotherapy studies such as Dr. Ben Saunders (TF-CBT, et al) could provide edification. Dean Tong. www.abuse-excuse.com Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone On Feb 6, 2018 9:04 PM, Tamara Hurst wrote: Greetings, I am working with a social work graduate student who wants to explore if forensic interviews of children and recall of adverse childhood experiences inadvertently re-traumatizes the victims. I asked her to review the literature for studies that are similar to her research question but she has not found any. This surprises me. Does anyone know of studies that measure potential trauma experienced by children through the forensic interview process? Thank you for your help. Tamara Tamara E. Hurst, Ph.D., LCSW The University of Southern Mississippi School of Social Work tamara.hurst@usm.edu 601-266-4173

Your query could apply to victims who've been abused, but also non-abused victims, too. I don't believe the primary authors (Lamb, Esplin, et al) of the NICHD best practices forensic child interview methodology, or APSAC, or RATAC (Finding Words, Cornerhouse, ChildFirst), et al have studied the traumatic effects of re-victimization from forensic child interviews. Perhaps, this would be an issue that experts in psychotherapy studies such as Dr. Ben Saunders (TF-CBT, et al) could provide edification. Dean Tong. www.abuse-excuse.com Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone On Feb 6, 2018 9:04 PM, Tamara Hurst wrote: Greetings, I am working with a social work graduate student who wants to explore if forensic interviews of children and recall of adverse childhood experiences inadvertently re-traumatizes the victims. I asked her to review the literature for studies that are similar to her research question but she has not found any. This surprises me. Does anyone know of studies that measure potential trauma experienced by children through the forensic interview process? Thank you for your help. Tamara Tamara E. Hurst, Ph.D., LCSW The University of Southern Mississippi School of Social Work tamara.hurstusm.edu 601-266-4173