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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8377
Date: 2011-10-24

Author:Sue Foley

Subject:RE: best practices for CSA interviewing

Hi everyone I was at the ISPCAN conference in Finland and heard some interesting presentations from Finland. The program may be on the website www.ispcan.org You could also speak with Sheri Oz who has written a book on her work in Israel. Dr Arnon Bentovim may also be able to assist in regard to the UK practices. There is also a service in India which uses a number of EB practices .. it is called Arpan www.arpan.org.in theye were at the ISPCAN conference in India in October Regards Sue Foley From: bounce-38185232-6832974@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-38185232-6832974@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Raelene Freitag Sent: Monday, 24 October 2011 9:55 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: best practices for CSA interviewing in United States Folks, just for clarification, we don’t consider SDM assessments to be a protocol for forensic interviewing. It could sit alongside the NICHD or Cornerstone interview protocols, or any other. It is more for key case management decisions rather than gathering of forensic information. Lisa, on your original question, I’m not familiar with how western European jurisdictions organize their response to child sexual abuse… Raelene Freitag MSW, Ph.D. Director Children's Research Center 426 S. Yellowstone Drive Madison, WI 53719 608-831-1180 www.nccd-crc.org CRC is a nonprofit social research organization and division of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency Please do not send any identifying or confidential information (names, birthdates) via Email. It is possible for third parties to intercept information transmitted in an Email. Case or referral numbers (but not social security numbers) may be included where necessary. Intercepting persons cannot use these numbers to identify a client unless they have access to the host application or database. From: bounce-38184593-13366172@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-38184593-13366172@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of DeanTong@aol.com Sent: Sunday, October 23, 2011 12:43 PM To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Subject: Re: best practices for CSA interviewing in United States In the USA, the National Institute for Child Health & Human Development (NICHD) fully-structured forensic child interview methodology first published in 2000 by Esplin, Lamb, et al and attached for your perusal represents best practice - best evidence. Second in line would be the Finding Words - Cornerstone - RATAC method. Here is the link to follow-up peer reviewed analysis of the NICHD method - www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/224524.pdf Dean Tong Dean Tong, MSc., Forensic Trial Consultant/Expert 604 Brentwood Place Brandon, FL 33511 813.657.4930, Ph/Fax 813.417.5362, Cell 813.523.5187, Emergency Cell DeanTong@aol.com http://www.abuse-excuse.com/ Disclaimer: Dean Tong is not an attorney. He is not licensed to give legal advice and nothing herein should be construed to be legal advice. If you need legal assistance please consult with an attorney in your area by checking here http://www.abanet.org/lawyerlocator/searchlawyer.html. This e-mail is strictly confidential pursuant to the Attorney/Work-Product Doctrine. In a message dated 10/23/2011 1:33:53 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, trudyk@pacbell.net writes: In El Dorado County California, we use the SDM as well. As a former social worker with the child protective services emergency response unit, I did not particularly think it was useful. The "forced choices" in some of the items did not lend one to be specific about individual cases. However, in lieu of nothing that is somewhat standardized, it is OK. Several counties used another instrument as well. Here is a link to a description of the SDM from our state's child welfare website. http://www.childsworld.ca.gov/PG1332.htm Here is a summary report on some assessment instruments (2005). "Risk and Safety Assessment in Child Welfare: Instrument Comparisons". http://cssr.berkeley.edu/bassc/public/risk_summ.pdf Here is a 200+ page study of the SDM and child welfare. It depicts the decision trees for specific allegations - neglect, sexual abuse, etc. "Structured Decision Making® and Child Welfare Service Delivery Project" (2008) http://www.csulb.edu/projects/ccwrl/Brooks.pdf Regards, Trudy Trudy C. Kilian, M.S. Human Services and Community Planning Consultant Home Office: 530-622-6400 (Preferred phone #) Cell: 530-919-0244 On Fri, Oct 21, 2011 at 9:56 AM, Lisa Fontes > wrote: Dear Colleagues, I am looking for information about the extent to which what we consider "best practices" for interviewing and following cases of suspected child sexual abuse in the U.S.--the multidisciplinary teams and the structured forensic interviews--is also used in Western Europe. I would be interested in country-specific as well as general information, directed to the list or to me personally. Thank you! Lisa Fontes, Ph.D. University of Massachusetts Lfontes@uww.umass.edu

Hi everyone I was at the ISPCAN conference in Finland and heard some interesting presentations from Finland. The program may be on the website www.ispcan.org You could also speak with Sheri Oz who has written a book on her work in Israel. Dr Arnon Bentovim may also be able to assist in regard to the UK practices. There is also a service in India which uses a number of EB practices .. it is called Arpan www.arpan.org.in theye were at the ISPCAN conference in India in October Regards Sue Foley From: bounce-38185232-6832974list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-38185232-6832974list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Raelene Freitag Sent: Monday, 24 October 2011 9:55 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: best practices for CSA interviewing in United States Folks, just for clarification, we don’t consider SDM assessments to be a protocol for forensic interviewing. It could sit alongside the NICHD or Cornerstone interview protocols, or any other. It is more for key case management decisions rather than gathering of forensic information. Lisa, on your original question, I’m not familiar with how western European jurisdictions organize their response to child sexual abuse… Raelene Freitag MSW, Ph.D. Director Children's Research Center 426 S. Yellowstone Drive Madison, WI 53719 608-831-1180 www.nccd-crc.org CRC is a nonprofit social research organization and division of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency Please do not send any identifying or confidential information (names, birthdates) via Email. It is possible for third parties to intercept information transmitted in an Email. Case or referral numbers (but not social security numbers) may be included where necessary. Intercepting persons cannot use these numbers to identify a client unless they have access to the host application or database. From: bounce-38184593-13366172list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-38184593-13366172list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of DeanTongaol.com Sent: Sunday, October 23, 2011 12:43 PM To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Subject: Re: best practices for CSA interviewing in United States In the USA, the National Institute for Child Health & Human Development (NICHD) fully-structured forensic child interview methodology first published in 2000 by Esplin, Lamb, et al and attached for your perusal represents best practice - best evidence. Second in line would be the Finding Words - Cornerstone - RATAC method. Here is the link to follow-up peer reviewed analysis of the NICHD method - www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/224524.pdf Dean Tong Dean Tong, MSc., Forensic Trial Consultant/Expert 604 Brentwood Place Brandon, FL 33511 813.657.4930, Ph/Fax 813.417.5362, Cell 813.523.5187, Emergency Cell DeanTongaol.com http://www.abuse-excuse.com/ Disclaimer: Dean Tong is not an attorney. He is not licensed to give legal advice and nothing herein should be construed to be legal advice. If you need legal assistance please consult with an attorney in your area by checking here http://www.abanet.org/lawyerlocator/searchlawyer.html. This e-mail is strictly confidential pursuant to the Attorney/Work-Product Doctrine. In a message dated 10/23/2011 1:33:53 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, trudykpacbell.net writes: In El Dorado County California, we use the SDM as well. As a former social worker with the child protective services emergency response unit, I did not particularly think it was useful. The "forced choices" in some of the items did not lend one to be specific about individual cases. However, in lieu of nothing that is somewhat standardized, it is OK. Several counties used another instrument as well. Here is a link to a description of the SDM from our state's child welfare website. http://www.childsworld.ca.gov/PG1332.htm Here is a summary report on some assessment instruments (2005). "Risk and Safety Assessment in Child Welfare: Instrument Comparisons". http://cssr.berkeley.edu/bassc/public/risk_summ.pdf Here is a 200+ page study of the SDM and child welfare. It depicts the decision trees for specific allegations - neglect, sexual abuse, etc. "Structured Decision Making® and Child Welfare Service Delivery Project" (2008) http://www.csulb.edu/projects/ccwrl/Brooks.pdf Regards, Trudy Trudy C. Kilian, M.S. Human Services and Community Planning Consultant Home Office: 530-622-6400 (Preferred phone #) Cell: 530-919-0244 On Fri, Oct 21, 2011 at 9:56 AM, Lisa Fontes > wrote: Dear Colleagues, I am looking for information about the extent to which what we consider "best practices" for interviewing and following cases of suspected child sexual abuse in the U.S.--the multidisciplinary teams and the structured forensic interviews--is also used in Western Europe. I would be interested in country-specific as well as general information, directed to the list or to me personally. Thank you! Lisa Fontes, Ph.D. University of Massachusetts Lfontesuww.umass.edu