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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8362
Date: 2010-12-04

Author:Sally Borden

Subject:RE: legislation

In VT , in 2009 our legislature passed “An Act Relating To Improving Vermont’s Sexual Abuse Response System,” - a number of legislative changes including a directive to strengthen sexual violence prevention by its inclusion in the definition of “health education” to be provided by Vermont schools. Here is a link to the Technical Assistance Resource Guide (TARG) developed by VT’s Sexual Violence Prevention Task Force in response to this directive: http://education.vermont.gov/new/pdfdoc/pgm_health_ed/publications_resources/educ_health_ed_TARG.pdf Additionally, VT developed materials in collaboration with the Canadian Centre for Child Protection’s based on their “Commit to Kids” curriculum, which are being distributed to schools, child care centers, etc.. Unfortunately as is often the case, these legislative changes came about largely as a result of a child sexual abuse/homicide tragedy. This also provides an important opportunity, however, to improve our prevention efforts in our schools and communities. Sally Borden, M.Ed., Executive Director KidSafe Collaborative 308 Pine Street, Burlington, VT 05401 802.863.9626 sallyb@kidsafevt.org * www.kidsafevt.org From: Barbara Shaffer [mailto:bshaffer@preventchildabuse.org] Sent: Thursday, December 02, 2010 1:18 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: legislation I think looking at all abuse makes the most sense in that it all impacts the children and the parents. I would also contact NAMI, National Alliance of Mental Ilness, http://www.nami.org/ to see what national information they have on it. The more wholestic approach we can give families the better off they all are as the children and parents clearly don't live separately as some of our systems seem to think they do. Good luck! On Thu, Dec 2, 2010 at 10:32 AM, > wrote: I agree that focus on sex abuse is too narrow. My observation after years on a Child Fatality Review Committee is that educational neglect, specifically absenteeism, is like the canary in the mine shaft. It masks other forms of maltreatment and social dysfunction, such as children being kept out of school to baby-sit or to allow time for physical abuse scars to heal. Though teachers may be mandated reporters, they may be pressured to screen indicated abuse through school administrators. Also, the responsibilities of the proliferating charter schools (which are publicly funded) need to be spelled out in legislation. What happens when a child drops out of a charter school and his existence is unknown to the public system? Aeolian M. Jackson, DSW -- Barbara Shaffer Senior Director of Chapter Services 720-282-4818 mtn time www.preventchildabuse.org

In VT , in 2009 our legislature passed “An Act Relating To Improving Vermont’s Sexual Abuse Response System,” - a number of legislative changes including a directive to strengthen sexual violence prevention by its inclusion in the definition of “health education” to be provided by Vermont schools. Here is a link to the Technical Assistance Resource Guide (TARG) developed by VT’s Sexual Violence Prevention Task Force in response to this directive: http://education.vermont.gov/new/pdfdoc/pgm_health_ed/publications_resources/educ_health_ed_TARG.pdf Additionally, VT developed materials in collaboration with the Canadian Centre for Child Protection’s based on their “Commit to Kids” curriculum, which are being distributed to schools, child care centers, etc.. Unfortunately as is often the case, these legislative changes came about largely as a result of a child sexual abuse/homicide tragedy. This also provides an important opportunity, however, to improve our prevention efforts in our schools and communities. Sally Borden, M.Ed., Executive Director KidSafe Collaborative 308 Pine Street, Burlington, VT 05401 802.863.9626 sallybkidsafevt.org * www.kidsafevt.org From: Barbara Shaffer [mailto:bshafferpreventchildabuse.org] Sent: Thursday, December 02, 2010 1:18 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: legislation I think looking at all abuse makes the most sense in that it all impacts the children and the parents. I would also contact NAMI, National Alliance of Mental Ilness, http://www.nami.org/ to see what national information they have on it. The more wholestic approach we can give families the better off they all are as the children and parents clearly don't live separately as some of our systems seem to think they do. Good luck! On Thu, Dec 2, 2010 at 10:32 AM, > wrote: I agree that focus on sex abuse is too narrow. My observation after years on a Child Fatality Review Committee is that educational neglect, specifically absenteeism, is like the canary in the mine shaft. It masks other forms of maltreatment and social dysfunction, such as children being kept out of school to baby-sit or to allow time for physical abuse scars to heal. Though teachers may be mandated reporters, they may be pressured to screen indicated abuse through school administrators. Also, the responsibilities of the proliferating charter schools (which are publicly funded) need to be spelled out in legislation. What happens when a child drops out of a charter school and his existence is unknown to the public system? Aeolian M. Jackson, DSW -- Barbara Shaffer Senior Director of Chapter Services 720-282-4818 mtn time www.preventchildabuse.org