Skip to main content



Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Browse or Search All Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8349
Date: 2010-01-21

Author:Faller, Kathleen

Subject:RE: Good touch - bad touch

Mike, There is not research to document that good touch bad touch is problematic. This is a quote from the 1993 User Manual on CSA which I authored for the USDHHS. There is no research I am aware of in the interim. "Some objections have been raised to the concepts of good and bad touch, and it may be advisable to avoid using this concept for three reasons. First, the term, touch, may foreclose consideration of some types of activity (for example, licking or object or penile intrusion). Second, the terms, good and bad, may be too vague in that they do not connote the actual body parts. Third, the use of good and bad to refer to breasts, genitalia, and anus may lead to negative perceptions of the private body parts. However, these views of good and bad touch represent professional preference. There is no evidence that the use of the "good touch/bad touch" approach either contaminates or invalidates an interview." Also, the NCAC has routinely used "good tocuh/bad touch" as part of their forensic interview and extended assessment. Here is a quote from my 2007 book. "The practice of educating the child about “good touch,” “bad touch,” and “confusing touch” is another way to introducing the topic of concern when children have not disclosed (e.g., Carnes & LeDuc, 1998; Hindeman, 1987). Carnes, Wilson, & Nelson-Gardell (1999) noted that in the 12-session model of the National Children’s Advocacy Center’s extended assessment, most of the children who disclosed did so in the “Touch Continuum” portion of the extended assessment model. Although this finding may speak to the efficacy of the “Touch Continuum,” it may also be a function of where in the model the “Touch Continuum” was placed (before the use of focused questions)." Finally, Sandy Hewitt has rountinely used a touch continuum in her clinical work and writings. See her 1999 book. Kathleen Coulborn Faller, Ph.D., A.C.S.W., L.M.S.W. Marion Elizabeth Blue Professor of Children and Families Director of the Family Assessment Clinic School of Social Work The University of Michigan 1080 S. University Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1106 734 998 9700 kcfaller@umich.edu The information contained in this message may be privileged and confidential and is intended only for the use of the named recipients. This communication is protected by federal law, both the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and 18 United States Code Section 2511. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this in error and that any review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify me immediately by phone (collect, if long distance) and destroy the message as you would confidential information ________________________________ From: bounce-5040943-6833631@list.cornell.edu [bounce-5040943-6833631@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Mike_Haney@doh.state.fl.us [Mike_Haney@doh.state.fl.us] Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2010 6:08 PM To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu; child-maltreatment-research-L@cornell.edu Subject: Good touch - bad touch We're working with our partners on the issue of "Good Touch - Bad Touch" -- can anyone help with research that articulates why the wording and message may be problematic when working with children? Thanks for your help. Mike Michael L. Haney Ph.D, NCC, LMHC Division Director for Prevention and Intervention Children's Medical Services Florida Department of Health 4052 Bald Cypress Way Bin A06 Tallahassee, FL 32399 Office: 850-245-4217 Fax: 850-414-7350 "Life should be a journey to the grave not with the intention of arriving in a pretty well preserved body, but arriving thoroughly used up, sliding in broadside proclaiming 'WOW, WHAT A RIDE'!!" Mission Statement: Promote, protect and improve the health of all people in Florida. ********************************************************* Please note: Florida has a very broad public records law. Most written communications to or from state officials regarding state business are public records available to the public and media upon request. Your e-mail communications may therefore be subject to public disclosure. ________________________________ For up-to-date information about H1N1 Swine Flu visit http://www.myflusafety.com or call 877 352 3581

Mike, There is not research to document that good touch bad touch is problematic. This is a quote from the 1993 User Manual on CSA which I authored for the USDHHS. There is no research I am aware of in the interim. "Some objections have been raised to the concepts of good and bad touch, and it may be advisable to avoid using this concept for three reasons. First, the term, touch, may foreclose consideration of some types of activity (for example, licking or object or penile intrusion). Second, the terms, good and bad, may be too vague in that they do not connote the actual body parts. Third, the use of good and bad to refer to breasts, genitalia, and anus may lead to negative perceptions of the private body parts. However, these views of good and bad touch represent professional preference. There is no evidence that the use of the "good touch/bad touch" approach either contaminates or invalidates an interview." Also, the NCAC has routinely used "good tocuh/bad touch" as part of their forensic interview and extended assessment. Here is a quote from my 2007 book. "The practice of educating the child about “good touch,” “bad touch,” and “confusing touch” is another way to introducing the topic of concern when children have not disclosed (e.g., Carnes & LeDuc, 1998; Hindeman, 1987). Carnes, Wilson, & Nelson-Gardell (1999) noted that in the 12-session model of the National Children’s Advocacy Center’s extended assessment, most of the children who disclosed did so in the “Touch Continuum” portion of the extended assessment model. Although this finding may speak to the efficacy of the “Touch Continuum,” it may also be a function of where in the model the “Touch Continuum” was placed (before the use of focused questions)." Finally, Sandy Hewitt has rountinely used a touch continuum in her clinical work and writings. See her 1999 book. Kathleen Coulborn Faller, Ph.D., A.C.S.W., L.M.S.W. Marion Elizabeth Blue Professor of Children and Families Director of the Family Assessment Clinic School of Social Work The University of Michigan 1080 S. University Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1106 734 998 9700 kcfallerumich.edu The information contained in this message may be privileged and confidential and is intended only for the use of the named recipients. This communication is protected by federal law, both the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and 18 United States Code Section 2511. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this in error and that any review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify me immediately by phone (collect, if long distance) and destroy the message as you would confidential information ________________________________ From: bounce-5040943-6833631list.cornell.edu [bounce-5040943-6833631list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Mike_Haneydoh.state.fl.us [Mike_Haneydoh.state.fl.us] Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2010 6:08 PM To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu; child-maltreatment-research-Lcornell.edu Subject: Good touch - bad touch We're working with our partners on the issue of "Good Touch - Bad Touch" -- can anyone help with research that articulates why the wording and message may be problematic when working with children? Thanks for your help. Mike Michael L. Haney Ph.D, NCC, LMHC Division Director for Prevention and Intervention Children's Medical Services Florida Department of Health 4052 Bald Cypress Way Bin A06 Tallahassee, FL 32399 Office: 850-245-4217 Fax: 850-414-7350 "Life should be a journey to the grave not with the intention of arriving in a pretty well preserved body, but arriving thoroughly used up, sliding in broadside proclaiming 'WOW, WHAT A RIDE'!!" Mission Statement: Promote, protect and improve the health of all people in Florida. ********************************************************* Please note: Florida has a very broad public records law. Most written communications to or from state officials regarding state business are public records available to the public and media upon request. Your e-mail communications may therefore be subject to public disclosure. ________________________________ For up-to-date information about H1N1 Swine Flu visit http://www.myflusafety.com or call 877 352 3581