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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8313
Date: 2009-11-27

Author:Suzy Salzinger

Subject:Re: child-on-child molestation

Chaffin, Mark J. (HSC) wrote: > > Tamara, > > Guidelines for investigation, assessment, services, case processing, > and public policy can be found in: > > Chaffin, M., Berliner, L., Block, R., Cavanaugh Johnson, T., > Friedrich, W.N., Garza Lewis, D., Lyon, T., Page, J., Prescott, D., & > Silovsky, J. (2008). Report of the ATSA Task Force on Children with > Sexual Behavior Problems. Child Maltreatment, 13 . 199-218. > > The Task Force heavily emphasized the need for individual case-by-case > determinations in these situations as opposed to broad policies or > mandates that might sweep up a collection of highly diverse situations > and attempt to force all of them into a single dispositional, > processing or services approach. IMO, the worst mistake we’ve made in > this area has been to approach this cases based on the template and > presumptions (not even necessarily articulated) used for > adult-on-child sexual abuse, when the situations and individuals > actually share very few characteristics outside of the shared labels > we apply to them. > > In terms of prevalence, this is an area that is highly dependent on > the definition of “abuse” that is applied. When it comes to young > children with other young children, that definition gets tricky, and > certainly we don’t want throw around loaded labels like perpetrator or > offender or victimization to characterize all forms of sexual behavior > among young children. Prevalence data is compromised to some extent by > the fact that data capture is highly dependent on whether the event is > reported and if so to whom. The following is excerpted from the recent > national survey of childhood victimization conducted by Finkelhor, et > al., which I think has some methodological advantages over official > report data. (OJJDP publication, Oct. 2009). You should check the > original pub to see the definitions and methods used. You’ll note that > peer-on-peer events are not exactly an everyday occurrence for most > juveniles, but still form a large portion of the total and are as > common or more common that events by adults. > > “Overall, 6.1 percent of all children sur­veyed had been sexually > victimized in the past year and nearly 1 in 10 (9.8 percent) over > their lifetimes. Sexual victimizations included attempted and > completed rape (1.1 percent past year, 2.4 percent life­time); sexual > assault by a known adult (0.3 percent past year, 1.2 percent > lifetime), an adult stranger (0.3 percent past year, 0.5 percent > lifetime), or a peer (1.3 percent past year, 2.7 percent lifetime); > flashing or sexual exposure by an adult (0.4 percent past year, 0.6 > percent lifetime) or peer (2.2 percent past year, 3.7 percent > life­time); sexual harassment (2.6 percent past year, 4.2 percent > lifetime); and statutory sexual offenses (0.1 percent past year, 0.4 > percent lifetime). Adolescents ages 14 to 17 were by far the most > likely to be sexually victimized” > > These peer figures appear to include all juvenile-on-juvenile rates > and might be heavily influenced by the teen-on-teen cases, so you may > want to look for any other presentations out of this data set that > focus more sharply on child-on-child rates. > > There is another OJJDP pub due out soon (Ormrod, Finkelhor, Chaffin) > that shows some interesting contour plots of victim age plotted > against abuser age for juvenile-on-juvenile events known to law > enforcement. It should appear on the OJJDP web site when published. > > MC > > *From:* Hurst, Tamara [mailto:Tamara.Hurst@choa.org] > *Sent:* Wednesday, November 25, 2009 11:21 AM > *Subject:* child-on-child molestation > > Hello everyone. How are reports of child-on-child molestation handled > in your jurisdiction? Is there a protocol for their investigation or > are they screened out? Also, does anyone know of statistics on the > rate or occurrence of child-on-child reports? Thanks! > > Tamara Hurst, LCSW > > Forensic Specialist > > Child Protection Center > > Children's Healthcare of Atlanta > > 404-785-3817 > > tamara.hurst@choa.org > Tamara, I would definitely endorse Mark Caffin's thoughtful answer to your query. Suzanne Salzinger

Chaffin, Mark J. (HSC) wrote: > > Tamara, > > Guidelines for investigation, assessment, services, case processing, > and public policy can be found in: > > Chaffin, M., Berliner, L., Block, R., Cavanaugh Johnson, T., > Friedrich, W.N., Garza Lewis, D., Lyon, T., Page, J., Prescott, D., & > Silovsky, J. (2008). Report of the ATSA Task Force on Children with > Sexual Behavior Problems. Child Maltreatment, 13 . 199-218. > > The Task Force heavily emphasized the need for individual case-by-case > determinations in these situations as opposed to broad policies or > mandates that might sweep up a collection of highly diverse situations > and attempt to force all of them into a single dispositional, > processing or services approach. IMO, the worst mistake we’ve made in > this area has been to approach this cases based on the template and > presumptions (not even necessarily articulated) used for > adult-on-child sexual abuse, when the situations and individuals > actually share very few characteristics outside of the shared labels > we apply to them. > > In terms of prevalence, this is an area that is highly dependent on > the definition of “abuse” that is applied. When it comes to young > children with other young children, that definition gets tricky, and > certainly we don’t want throw around loaded labels like perpetrator or > offender or victimization to characterize all forms of sexual behavior > among young children. Prevalence data is compromised to some extent by > the fact that data capture is highly dependent on whether the event is > reported and if so to whom. The following is excerpted from the recent > national survey of childhood victimization conducted by Finkelhor, et > al., which I think has some methodological advantages over official > report data. (OJJDP publication, Oct. 2009). You should check the > original pub to see the definitions and methods used. You’ll note that > peer-on-peer events are not exactly an everyday occurrence for most > juveniles, but still form a large portion of the total and are as > common or more common that events by adults. > > “Overall, 6.1 percent of all children sur­veyed had been sexually > victimized in the past year and nearly 1 in 10 (9.8 percent) over > their lifetimes. Sexual victimizations included attempted and > completed rape (1.1 percent past year, 2.4 percent life­time); sexual > assault by a known adult (0.3 percent past year, 1.2 percent > lifetime), an adult stranger (0.3 percent past year, 0.5 percent > lifetime), or a peer (1.3 percent past year, 2.7 percent lifetime); > flashing or sexual exposure by an adult (0.4 percent past year, 0.6 > percent lifetime) or peer (2.2 percent past year, 3.7 percent > life­time); sexual harassment (2.6 percent past year, 4.2 percent > lifetime); and statutory sexual offenses (0.1 percent past year, 0.4 > percent lifetime). Adolescents ages 14 to 17 were by far the most > likely to be sexually victimized” > > These peer figures appear to include all juvenile-on-juvenile rates > and might be heavily influenced by the teen-on-teen cases, so you may > want to look for any other presentations out of this data set that > focus more sharply on child-on-child rates. > > There is another OJJDP pub due out soon (Ormrod, Finkelhor, Chaffin) > that shows some interesting contour plots of victim age plotted > against abuser age for juvenile-on-juvenile events known to law > enforcement. It should appear on the OJJDP web site when published. > > MC > > *From:* Hurst, Tamara [mailto:Tamara.Hurstchoa.org] > *Sent:* Wednesday, November 25, 2009 11:21 AM > *Subject:* child-on-child molestation > > Hello everyone. How are reports of child-on-child molestation handled > in your jurisdiction? Is there a protocol for their investigation or > are they screened out? Also, does anyone know of statistics on the > rate or occurrence of child-on-child reports? Thanks! > > Tamara Hurst, LCSW > > Forensic Specialist > > Child Protection Center > > Children's Healthcare of Atlanta > > 404-785-3817 > > tamara.hurstchoa.org > Tamara, I would definitely endorse Mark Caffin's thoughtful answer to your query. Suzanne Salzinger