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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8312
Date: 2009-11-26

Author:Chaffin, Mark J. (HSC)

Subject:RE: child-on-child molestation

Tamara, Guidelines for investigation, assessment, services, case processing, and public policy can be found in: Chaffin, M., Berliner, L., Block, R., Cavanaugh Johnson, T., Friedrich, W.N., Garza Lewis, D., Lyon, T., Page, J., Prescott, D., & Silovsky, J. (2008). Report of the ATSA Task Force on Children with Sexual Behavior Problems. Child Maltreatment, 13. 199-218. The Task Force heavily emphasized the need for individual case-by-case determinations in these situations as opposed to broad policies or mandates that might sweep up a collection of highly diverse situations and attempt to force all of them into a single dispositional, processing or services approach. IMO, the worst mistake we’ve made in this area has been to approach this cases based on the template and presumptions (not even necessarily articulated) used for adult-on-child sexual abuse, when the situations and individuals actually share very few characteristics outside of the shared labels we apply to them. In terms of prevalence, this is an area that is highly dependent on the definition of “abuse” that is applied. When it comes to young children with other young children, that definition gets tricky, and certainly we don’t want throw around loaded labels like perpetrator or offender or victimization to characterize all forms of sexual behavior among young children. Prevalence data is compromised to some extent by the fact that data capture is highly dependent on whether the event is reported and if so to whom. The following is excerpted from the recent national survey of childhood victimization conducted by Finkelhor, et al., which I think has some methodological advantages over official report data. (OJJDP publication, Oct. 2009). You should check the original pub to see the definitions and methods used. You’ll note that peer-on-peer events are not exactly an everyday occurrence for most juveniles, but still form a large portion of the total and are as common or more common that events by adults. “Overall, 6.1 percent of all children sur­veyed had been sexually victimized in the past year and nearly 1 in 10 (9.8 percent) over their lifetimes. Sexual victimizations included attempted and completed rape (1.1 percent past year, 2.4 percent life­time); sexual assault by a known adult (0.3 percent past year, 1.2 percent lifetime), an adult stranger (0.3 percent past year, 0.5 percent lifetime), or a peer (1.3 percent past year, 2.7 percent lifetime); flashing or sexual exposure by an adult (0.4 percent past year, 0.6 percent lifetime) or peer (2.2 percent past year, 3.7 percent life­time); sexual harassment (2.6 percent past year, 4.2 percent lifetime); and statutory sexual offenses (0.1 percent past year, 0.4 percent lifetime). Adolescents ages 14 to 17 were by far the most likely to be sexually victimized” These peer figures appear to include all juvenile-on-juvenile rates and might be heavily influenced by the teen-on-teen cases, so you may want to look for any other presentations out of this data set that focus more sharply on child-on-child rates. There is another OJJDP pub due out soon (Ormrod, Finkelhor, Chaffin) that shows some interesting contour plots of victim age plotted against abuser age for juvenile-on-juvenile events known to law enforcement. It should appear on the OJJDP web site when published. MC From: Hurst, Tamara [mailto:Tamara.Hurst@choa.org] Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2009 11:21 AM Subject: child-on-child molestation Hello everyone. How are reports of child-on-child molestation handled in your jurisdiction? Is there a protocol for their investigation or are they screened out? Also, does anyone know of statistics on the rate or occurrence of child-on-child reports? Thanks! Tamara Hurst, LCSW Forensic Specialist Child Protection Center Children's Healthcare of Atlanta 404-785-3817 tamara.hurst@choa.org

Tamara, Guidelines for investigation, assessment, services, case processing, and public policy can be found in: Chaffin, M., Berliner, L., Block, R., Cavanaugh Johnson, T., Friedrich, W.N., Garza Lewis, D., Lyon, T., Page, J., Prescott, D., & Silovsky, J. (2008). Report of the ATSA Task Force on Children with Sexual Behavior Problems. Child Maltreatment, 13. 199-218. The Task Force heavily emphasized the need for individual case-by-case determinations in these situations as opposed to broad policies or mandates that might sweep up a collection of highly diverse situations and attempt to force all of them into a single dispositional, processing or services approach. IMO, the worst mistake we’ve made in this area has been to approach this cases based on the template and presumptions (not even necessarily articulated) used for adult-on-child sexual abuse, when the situations and individuals actually share very few characteristics outside of the shared labels we apply to them. In terms of prevalence, this is an area that is highly dependent on the definition of “abuse” that is applied. When it comes to young children with other young children, that definition gets tricky, and certainly we don’t want throw around loaded labels like perpetrator or offender or victimization to characterize all forms of sexual behavior among young children. Prevalence data is compromised to some extent by the fact that data capture is highly dependent on whether the event is reported and if so to whom. The following is excerpted from the recent national survey of childhood victimization conducted by Finkelhor, et al., which I think has some methodological advantages over official report data. (OJJDP publication, Oct. 2009). You should check the original pub to see the definitions and methods used. You’ll note that peer-on-peer events are not exactly an everyday occurrence for most juveniles, but still form a large portion of the total and are as common or more common that events by adults. “Overall, 6.1 percent of all children sur­veyed had been sexually victimized in the past year and nearly 1 in 10 (9.8 percent) over their lifetimes. Sexual victimizations included attempted and completed rape (1.1 percent past year, 2.4 percent life­time); sexual assault by a known adult (0.3 percent past year, 1.2 percent lifetime), an adult stranger (0.3 percent past year, 0.5 percent lifetime), or a peer (1.3 percent past year, 2.7 percent lifetime); flashing or sexual exposure by an adult (0.4 percent past year, 0.6 percent lifetime) or peer (2.2 percent past year, 3.7 percent life­time); sexual harassment (2.6 percent past year, 4.2 percent lifetime); and statutory sexual offenses (0.1 percent past year, 0.4 percent lifetime). Adolescents ages 14 to 17 were by far the most likely to be sexually victimized” These peer figures appear to include all juvenile-on-juvenile rates and might be heavily influenced by the teen-on-teen cases, so you may want to look for any other presentations out of this data set that focus more sharply on child-on-child rates. There is another OJJDP pub due out soon (Ormrod, Finkelhor, Chaffin) that shows some interesting contour plots of victim age plotted against abuser age for juvenile-on-juvenile events known to law enforcement. It should appear on the OJJDP web site when published. MC From: Hurst, Tamara [mailto:Tamara.Hurstchoa.org] Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2009 11:21 AM Subject: child-on-child molestation Hello everyone. How are reports of child-on-child molestation handled in your jurisdiction? Is there a protocol for their investigation or are they screened out? Also, does anyone know of statistics on the rate or occurrence of child-on-child reports? Thanks! Tamara Hurst, LCSW Forensic Specialist Child Protection Center Children's Healthcare of Atlanta 404-785-3817 tamara.hurstchoa.org