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Message ID: 8290
Date: 2009-10-19

Author:Walter Fahr

Subject:Re: research on child abuse registry screenings/clearances

Christine,



As one who has performed child abuse and neglect screenings for many years let me point out some of the issues related to your question about effectiveness. First, the original purpose for Child Protective Services child abuse and neglect registries was to establish a history on families for the purposes of assessing risk. Past behavior being believed to be a predictor of future behavior. The use of these CPS registries for employment screenings has evolved over time culminating more recently with the Federal Adam Walsh Act. Your question appears to be more focused on the latter, effectiveness of CPS screenings for employment purposes.



The other issue in your question was whether you meant CPS screenings and/or criminal records checks for employment purposes. They are clearly different data bases but are both used for employment clearances.



As an anecdotal response to your question for CPS screenings, yes, I have seen a few cases of persons applying to be foster or adoptive parents who had a prior history of child abuse or neglect who were identified. However, I cannot address what the requesting agency has chosen to do with this information. We are also regularly getting inquiries from persons who are trying to get their names expunged from a CPS registry because they were denied a license or employment in a child care related field. Individuals are being identified, but it still does not answer your ultimate question are children safer because of these requirements.



Walter



Walter G. Fahr, LCSW

Program Manager-Child Protective Services

Office of Community Services

State of Louisiana

(225)342-6832

fax (225)342-9087

wfahr@dss.state.la.us

( http://www.dss.louisiana.gov/MissingKids )





>>> Christine Deyss 10/15/2009 9:12 PM >>>

I'm looking for any research evaluating the usefulness, or simply the effect, of

child abuse registry screening (clearance) processes. Do we have evidence that,

if people found to have abused or neglected their own children are disallowed

from employment in positions where they work with children, then children are

safer? Or even research on the impact of screening and "positive hits" on

employment?



--

Christine Deyss

Executive Director

Prevent Child Abuse New York

cdeyss@preventchildabuseny.org



-------------------------------------------------

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Christine,



As one who has performed child abuse and neglect screenings for many years let me point out some of the issues related to your question about effectiveness. First, the original purpose for Child Protective Services child abuse and neglect registries was to establish a history on families for the purposes of assessing risk. Past behavior being believed to be a predictor of future behavior. The use of these CPS registries for employment screenings has evolved over time culminating more recently with the Federal Adam Walsh Act. Your question appears to be more focused on the latter, effectiveness of CPS screenings for employment purposes.



The other issue in your question was whether you meant CPS screenings and/or criminal records checks for employment purposes. They are clearly different data bases but are both used for employment clearances.



As an anecdotal response to your question for CPS screenings, yes, I have seen a few cases of persons applying to be foster or adoptive parents who had a prior history of child abuse or neglect who were identified. However, I cannot address what the requesting agency has chosen to do with this information. We are also regularly getting inquiries from persons who are trying to get their names expunged from a CPS registry because they were denied a license or employment in a child care related field. Individuals are being identified, but it still does not answer your ultimate question are children safer because of these requirements.



Walter



Walter G. Fahr, LCSW

Program Manager-Child Protective Services

Office of Community Services

State of Louisiana

(225)342-6832

fax (225)342-9087

wfahrdss.state.la.us

( http://www.dss.louisiana.gov/MissingKids )





>>> Christine Deyss 10/15/2009 9:12 PM >>>

I'm looking for any research evaluating the usefulness, or simply the effect, of

child abuse registry screening (clearance) processes. Do we have evidence that,

if people found to have abused or neglected their own children are disallowed

from employment in positions where they work with children, then children are

safer? Or even research on the impact of screening and "positive hits" on

employment?



--

Christine Deyss

Executive Director

Prevent Child Abuse New York

cdeysspreventchildabuseny.org



-------------------------------------------------

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