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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Browse or Search All Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8273
Date: 2009-09-24

Author:DeanTongaol.com

Subject:Re: indicated reports vs unfounded reports

So are you saying that five or eight or eleven unfounded abuse reports against an accused individual or family may or does equal a moderate or higher risk to the alleged child victims for actual abuse or for perhaps emotional/psychological abuse of the kids due to false allegations? Dean Tong, MSc., Forensic Trial Consultant 604 Brentwood Place Brandon, FL 33511 813.657.4930, Ph/Fax 813.417.5362, Cell DeanTong@aol.com TongDean56@gmail.com (E-Mail Attached Files, Only) http://www.abuse-excuse.com/ http://www.DeanTong.com Disclaimer: Dean Tong is not an attorney. He is not licensed to give legal advice and nothing herein should be construed to be legal advice. If you need legal assistance please consult with an attorney in your area by checking here http://www.abanet.org/lawyerlocator/searchlawyer.html . In a message dated 9/22/2009 11:00:05 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, crystalle.williams@dhhs.nc.gov writes: The North Carolina Structured Family Risk Assessment of Abuse/Neglect also counts the number of reports, not substantiations or findings of "Services Not Recommended," that have ever been made in regards to the children in the family, to determine the likelihood of risk. Additionally, there is another item on the tool that asks how many of those reported cases were substantiated or found to be "in need of services," or those when out-of-home placement was necessary. So, both- number reports made and actual findings- are considered in the overall level of risk to the children. To respond to your question about vulnerability, I think that in some cases, children are just as vulnerable when there is a history of unfounded reports. Social workers, of course, don't know this at the time; they go on the information gathered during the CPS Assessment. For example, when we assess reports involving domestic violence or substance abuse, it is common for a report to be unsubstantiated or found to not need services due to the secrecy, denial, and fear involved for all family members, but that doesn't mean that the children are not at risk, and may be hurt later. If the actual safety factors are not revealed during the assessment, then it is possible for us to miss it, therefore unknowingly leaving a vulnerable child at risk. Crystalle Williams, MSW NC Division of Social Services Staff Development Team Child Welfare Section 704-399-8160 crystalle.williams@dhhs.nc.gov

So are you saying that five or eight or eleven unfounded abuse reports against an accused individual or family may or does equal a moderate or higher risk to the alleged child victims for actual abuse or for perhaps emotional/psychological abuse of the kids due to false allegations? Dean Tong, MSc., Forensic Trial Consultant 604 Brentwood Place Brandon, FL 33511 813.657.4930, Ph/Fax 813.417.5362, Cell DeanTongaol.com TongDean56gmail.com (E-Mail Attached Files, Only) http://www.abuse-excuse.com/ http://www.DeanTong.com Disclaimer: Dean Tong is not an attorney. He is not licensed to give legal advice and nothing herein should be construed to be legal advice. If you need legal assistance please consult with an attorney in your area by checking here http://www.abanet.org/lawyerlocator/searchlawyer.html . In a message dated 9/22/2009 11:00:05 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, crystalle.williamsdhhs.nc.gov writes: The North Carolina Structured Family Risk Assessment of Abuse/Neglect also counts the number of reports, not substantiations or findings of "Services Not Recommended," that have ever been made in regards to the children in the family, to determine the likelihood of risk. Additionally, there is another item on the tool that asks how many of those reported cases were substantiated or found to be "in need of services," or those when out-of-home placement was necessary. So, both- number reports made and actual findings- are considered in the overall level of risk to the children. To respond to your question about vulnerability, I think that in some cases, children are just as vulnerable when there is a history of unfounded reports. Social workers, of course, don't know this at the time; they go on the information gathered during the CPS Assessment. For example, when we assess reports involving domestic violence or substance abuse, it is common for a report to be unsubstantiated or found to not need services due to the secrecy, denial, and fear involved for all family members, but that doesn't mean that the children are not at risk, and may be hurt later. If the actual safety factors are not revealed during the assessment, then it is possible for us to miss it, therefore unknowingly leaving a vulnerable child at risk. Crystalle Williams, MSW NC Division of Social Services Staff Development Team Child Welfare Section 704-399-8160 crystalle.williamsdhhs.nc.gov