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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8239
Date: 2009-08-25

Author:Nolan, Catherine (ACF)

Subject:RE: changing demographics of child welfare population

I would encourage you to look at the LONGSCAN study which is still

ongoing - http://www.iprc.unc.edu/longscan/.



Catherine Nolan



Catherine M. Nolan, MSW, ACSW

Director

Office on Child Abuse and Neglect

Children's Bureau/ACYF/ACF

US Dept of Health and Human Services

1250 Maryland Ave, SW

Washington, DC 20024

202-260-5140

cnolan@acf.hhs.gov





-----Original Message-----

From: bounce-4207224-8830632@list.cornell.edu

[mailto:bounce-4207224-8830632@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Kristen

Shook Slack

Sent: Tuesday, August 25, 2009 1:20 PM

To: Child Maltreatment Researchers

Subject: changing demographics of child welfare population



Hello colleagues.



I am wondering if anyone has conducted or is aware of a longitudinal,

multi-cohort study of CPS-involved families (preferably families at the

CPS report or case-opening stage) that can shed light on whether the

nature, severity and mix of presenting family problems/issues has

changed over time, and specifically gotten more complex or more severe.



I realize that there are lots of factors that influence CPS intake

patterns that may also contribute to the changing nature/severity of

problems CPS families are dealing with (e.g., changes in screening or

case opening practices, etc), but am curious if there are existing

studies that are designed in the above way that can at least provide

some descriptive data on changes over time in presenting problems.

Preferably a study that involves a relatively recent cohort.



Thanks.



-Kristi



--

Kristen Shook Slack, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

School of Social Work

University of Wisconsin-Madison

1350 University Avenue

Madison, WI 53706



ph: 608-263-3671

fx: 608-263-3836















I would encourage you to look at the LONGSCAN study which is still

ongoing - http://www.iprc.unc.edu/longscan/.



Catherine Nolan



Catherine M. Nolan, MSW, ACSW

Director

Office on Child Abuse and Neglect

Children's Bureau/ACYF/ACF

US Dept of Health and Human Services

1250 Maryland Ave, SW

Washington, DC 20024

202-260-5140

cnolanacf.hhs.gov





-----Original Message-----

From: bounce-4207224-8830632list.cornell.edu

[mailto:bounce-4207224-8830632list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Kristen

Shook Slack

Sent: Tuesday, August 25, 2009 1:20 PM

To: Child Maltreatment Researchers

Subject: changing demographics of child welfare population



Hello colleagues.



I am wondering if anyone has conducted or is aware of a longitudinal,

multi-cohort study of CPS-involved families (preferably families at the

CPS report or case-opening stage) that can shed light on whether the

nature, severity and mix of presenting family problems/issues has

changed over time, and specifically gotten more complex or more severe.



I realize that there are lots of factors that influence CPS intake

patterns that may also contribute to the changing nature/severity of

problems CPS families are dealing with (e.g., changes in screening or

case opening practices, etc), but am curious if there are existing

studies that are designed in the above way that can at least provide

some descriptive data on changes over time in presenting problems.

Preferably a study that involves a relatively recent cohort.



Thanks.



-Kristi



--

Kristen Shook Slack, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

School of Social Work

University of Wisconsin-Madison

1350 University Avenue

Madison, WI 53706



ph: 608-263-3671

fx: 608-263-3836