Skip to main content



Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8234
Date: 2009-08-26

Author:Ben Saunders

Subject:Re: consent to participate in research for children in State's custody

In our work, the consent of the caregiver with legal custody is required. For children in state custody, that policy means our social services agency must give consent since it is the legal guardian. This is true for clinical treatment as well as research. For any research involving children in state custody, approval of the research must be granted the agency's "review boards," which is typically an ad hoc group of senior agency officials, at both the county and state levels, meaning two reviews are necessary. In general, our county Dept. of Social Services has been amenable to cooperating with research involving children in care, while our state level DSS has almost universally denied participation in even the most benign studies. Their standard has been that any perceived risk to children in their care is unacceptable, no matter how remote the probability or slight the possible impact. Convincing them otherwise has proved an extremely difficult proposition, with rare exceptions. Ben Silovsky, Jane F. (HSC) wrote: For research that involves children who are in protective custody, what are different State's policies and procedures in regards to who can consent for the child to participate in research and the procedures for informed consent? Thank you in advance. Jane Jane F. Silovsky, PhD Associate Professor OUHSC -- Benjamin E. Saunders, Ph.D. Professor and Associate Director National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Medical University of South Carolina 67 President Street, MSC 861 843-792-2945 Phone Charleston, SC 29425 www.musc.edu/ncvc Take our web-based course, TF-CBTWeb, at www.musc.edu/tfcbt

In our work, the consent of the caregiver with legal custody is required. For children in state custody, that policy means our social services agency must give consent since it is the legal guardian. This is true for clinical treatment as well as research. For any research involving children in state custody, approval of the research must be granted the agency's "review boards," which is typically an ad hoc group of senior agency officials, at both the county and state levels, meaning two reviews are necessary. In general, our county Dept. of Social Services has been amenable to cooperating with research involving children in care, while our state level DSS has almost universally denied participation in even the most benign studies. Their standard has been that any perceived risk to children in their care is unacceptable, no matter how remote the probability or slight the possible impact. Convincing them otherwise has proved an extremely difficult proposition, with rare exceptions. Ben Silovsky, Jane F. (HSC) wrote: For research that involves children who are in protective custody, what are different State's policies and procedures in regards to who can consent for the child to participate in research and the procedures for informed consent? Thank you in advance. Jane Jane F. Silovsky, PhD Associate Professor OUHSC -- Benjamin E. Saunders, Ph.D. Professor and Associate Director National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Medical University of South Carolina 67 President Street, MSC 861 843-792-2945 Phone Charleston, SC 29425 www.musc.edu/ncvc Take our web-based course, TF-CBTWeb, at www.musc.edu/tfcbt