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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8233
Date: 2009-08-26

Author:Elliott G Smith

Subject:Re: changing demographics of child welfare population

Hi Kristen, I'm not aware of recent cohort studies of CPS-involved families that are currently available and that can address your question. Catherine and Adolph have made suggestions. Perhaps others on this list will as well. I did want to mention, though, that In the coming months, the Data Archive (www.ndacan.cornell.edu ) expects to receive secondary datasets from the Fourth National Incidence Study on Child Abuse and Neglect (NIS-4) and from the first wave of the Second National Survey on Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW 2). The NIS has been conducted on three prior occasions, in 1980, 1987, and 1995. Baseline data collection for the first NSCAW study was concluded in 2000. While NIS-4 and NSCAW 2 were not designed as formal cohort follow-ups to their predecessors, there is quite a bit of continuity in the study goals and in the study designs. It will probably be possible to run analyses in parallel across the four NIS studies or the two NSCAW studies. You wouldn't combine NIS-4 or NSCAW 2 data with their predecessors. That wouldn't be appropriate, but you could align your analyses across the studies and speculate about changes over time. The exercise would likely generate more hypotheses than allow you to draw firm conclusions, but it could be done. I'll leave the operationalization of complexity or severity of family issues to others :) Hope this helps, Elliott On Tue, Aug 25, 2009 at 1:20 PM, Kristen Shook Slack > wrote: Hello colleagues. I am wondering if anyone has conducted or is aware of a longitudinal, multi-cohort study of CPS-involved families (preferably families at the CPS report or case-opening stage) that can shed light on whether the nature, severity and mix of presenting family problems/issues has changed over time, and specifically gotten more complex or more severe. I realize that there are lots of factors that influence CPS intake patterns that may also contribute to the changing nature/severity of problems CPS families are dealing with (e.g., changes in screening or case opening practices, etc), but am curious if there are existing studies that are designed in the above way that can at least provide some descriptive data on changes over time in presenting problems. Preferably a study that involves a relatively recent cohort. Thanks. -Kristi -- Kristen Shook Slack, Ph.D. Associate Professor School of Social Work University of Wisconsin-Madison 1350 University Avenue Madison, WI 53706 ph: 608-263-3671 fx: 608-263-3836 -- Elliott G. Smith, PhD Research Associate Family Life Development Center, College of Human Ecology Cornell University egs1@cornell.edu | 607.216.8347

Hi Kristen, I'm not aware of recent cohort studies of CPS-involved families that are currently available and that can address your question. Catherine and Adolph have made suggestions. Perhaps others on this list will as well. I did want to mention, though, that In the coming months, the Data Archive (www.ndacan.cornell.edu ) expects to receive secondary datasets from the Fourth National Incidence Study on Child Abuse and Neglect (NIS-4) and from the first wave of the Second National Survey on Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW 2). The NIS has been conducted on three prior occasions, in 1980, 1987, and 1995. Baseline data collection for the first NSCAW study was concluded in 2000. While NIS-4 and NSCAW 2 were not designed as formal cohort follow-ups to their predecessors, there is quite a bit of continuity in the study goals and in the study designs. It will probably be possible to run analyses in parallel across the four NIS studies or the two NSCAW studies. You wouldn't combine NIS-4 or NSCAW 2 data with their predecessors. That wouldn't be appropriate, but you could align your analyses across the studies and speculate about changes over time. The exercise would likely generate more hypotheses than allow you to draw firm conclusions, but it could be done. I'll leave the operationalization of complexity or severity of family issues to others :) Hope this helps, Elliott On Tue, Aug 25, 2009 at 1:20 PM, Kristen Shook Slack > wrote: Hello colleagues. I am wondering if anyone has conducted or is aware of a longitudinal, multi-cohort study of CPS-involved families (preferably families at the CPS report or case-opening stage) that can shed light on whether the nature, severity and mix of presenting family problems/issues has changed over time, and specifically gotten more complex or more severe. I realize that there are lots of factors that influence CPS intake patterns that may also contribute to the changing nature/severity of problems CPS families are dealing with (e.g., changes in screening or case opening practices, etc), but am curious if there are existing studies that are designed in the above way that can at least provide some descriptive data on changes over time in presenting problems. Preferably a study that involves a relatively recent cohort. Thanks. -Kristi -- Kristen Shook Slack, Ph.D. Associate Professor School of Social Work University of Wisconsin-Madison 1350 University Avenue Madison, WI 53706 ph: 608-263-3671 fx: 608-263-3836 -- Elliott G. Smith, PhD Research Associate Family Life Development Center, College of Human Ecology Cornell University egs1cornell.edu | 607.216.8347