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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8223
Date: 2009-08-03

Author:Adam Zolotor

Subject:Re: Rise in CM fatalities and classification of neglectful drownings

Just a bit to add, not sure I have the year correct, but for deaths

around 2007, in NC we started adding neglect deaths and our child abuse

homicide numbers reported to NCANDS tripled or so in NC. We use a child

death review process, and prior to that time, we were only reporting

physical abuse deaths. That alone could account for about 6% increase,

so if 1 or 2 other states made a similar change in reporting, this could

all be articicial.



Adam Zolotor



Chaffin, Mark J. (HSC) wrote:

> David,

>

> I have very little confidence in the accuracy of child maltreatment fatality rates, especially state-to-state comparisons. The problem is that what we might call "case finding" varies so widely from state-to-state, both procedurally and in terms of definitions. For example, as the Florida post describes, suspected maltreatment fatality cases there must be reported to a hotline. By contrast, in Oklahoma where I live, all child fatalities are screened by the child death review board, and a neglect related drowning would definitely be counted because the state uses very broad definitions of what constitutes a maltreatment fatality. So, there is no intermediate step requiring a hotline report, which presumably results in some case finding loss. Not surprisingly, Oklahoma has a higher rate than Florida. This case finding + definitional issue and how it affects rates has received very little if any scientific study. Of course, when various advocacy organizations get their hands on the figures and release them, it is virtually always without caveat or consideration of the problems in the numbers. Then, when the media gets ahold of them, its even worse. We were fortunate this year in that there was a reporter in our state who took the time to look into the nature of maltreatment fatality data, and wrote a follow-up article which was appropriately entitled "No good deed goes unpunished." In it, he described how states that use particularly diligent or thorough case finding for maltreatment fatalities regularly expose themselves to condemnation in the media.

>

> Mark

>

> ______________________________________

> From: Greg & Karen Rice [miami72@embarqmail.com]

> Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2009 9:26 AM

> Subject: Re: Rise in CM fatalities and classification of neglectful drownings

>

> In PA, this would be referred to as Imminent Risk, which is a type of child abuse resulting in serious physical injury (death included) or sexual abuse/exploitation due to neglect.

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: Finkelhor, David

> To: Jones, Lisa (FRL) ; riccil@aol.com ; riccil@aol.com ; Ying-Ying Yuan ; cnolan@acf.dhhs.gov ; alexanr@msm.edu ; child-maltreatment-research-L@cornell.edu

> Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2009 7:08 AM

> Subject: Rise in CM fatalities and classification of neglectful drownings

>

> In a NYT article today a Florida CWS administrator explained a recent rise in CM fatalities there to a new tendency to count drowning due to neglect as a CM fatality. The 2007 NCCANDS data showed a 15% rise in CM fatalities and increases in quite a few states. Does anyone of a sense that this is drowning classification change is something that extends beyond Florida

>

> David Finkelhor

> Crimes against Children Research Center

> Family Research Laboratory

> Department of Sociology, University of New Hampshire

> Durham, NH 03824

> Tel 603 862-2761* Fax 603 862-1122

> email: david.finkelhor@unh.edu

>

> My new book has been released. Click on it for more details and to order.

>

> [cid:4C427FF9F34F4610AA86DE8957822A67@DESKTOP]

>

>

>

> http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/

> http://www.unh.edu/frl/

>

>

> From: emailthis@ms3.lga2.nytimes.com [mailto:emailthis@ms3.lga2.nytimes.com] On Behalf Of david.finkelhor@unh.edu

> Sent: 2009-07-25 06:54

> To: Finkelhor, David

> Subject: NYTimes.com: Florida Shifts Child-Welfare System's Focus to Saving Families

>

>

>

>

>

> [http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/apps/emailthis/head_1.gif][http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/apps/emailthis/head_2.gif][http://graphics8.nytimes.com/adx/images/ADS/20/63/ad.206326/500days_nytimes_88x31_NP.gif]

>

>

>

>

>

> This page was sent to you by: david.finkelhor@unh.edu

>

> US | July 25, 2009

> Florida Shifts Child-Welfare System's Focus to Saving Families

> By ERIK ECKHOLM

> Officials in Florida shifted spending of federal foster care aid to focus on keeping families intact and to finance prevention and mental health treatment.

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> [http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/apps/emailthis/todays.gif]

> 1. Stock Traders Find Speed Pays, in Milliseconds

> 2. The Minimalist: 101 Simple Salads for the Season

> 3. Op-Ed Columnist: Costs and Compassion

> 4. 44 Charged by U.S. in New Jersey Corruption Sweep

> 5. Op-Ed Columnist: Kill the Rhinos!

>

> » Go to Complete List

>

>

>

>

> Advertisement

>

>

> Adam The story of two strangers, one a little stranger than the other. Starring Hugh Dancy and Rose Byrne. In theaters this summer.

> Click here to view trailer

>

> [http://graphics8.nytimes.com/adx/images/ADS/20/17/ad.201742/adam_120x60.gif]

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Copyright 2009 The New York Times Company | Privacy Policy

>

>

>

> [http://www.mailscanner.tv/1x1spacer.gif]

>

>

>

>

>









Just a bit to add, not sure I have the year correct, but for deaths

around 2007, in NC we started adding neglect deaths and our child abuse

homicide numbers reported to NCANDS tripled or so in NC. We use a child

death review process, and prior to that time, we were only reporting

physical abuse deaths. That alone could account for about 6% increase,

so if 1 or 2 other states made a similar change in reporting, this could

all be articicial.



Adam Zolotor



Chaffin, Mark J. (HSC) wrote:

> David,

>

> I have very little confidence in the accuracy of child maltreatment fatality rates, especially state-to-state comparisons. The problem is that what we might call "case finding" varies so widely from state-to-state, both procedurally and in terms of definitions. For example, as the Florida post describes, suspected maltreatment fatality cases there must be reported to a hotline. By contrast, in Oklahoma where I live, all child fatalities are screened by the child death review board, and a neglect related drowning would definitely be counted because the state uses very broad definitions of what constitutes a maltreatment fatality. So, there is no intermediate step requiring a hotline report, which presumably results in some case finding loss. Not surprisingly, Oklahoma has a higher rate than Florida. This case finding + definitional issue and how it affects rates has received very little if any scientific study. Of course, when various advocacy organizations get their hands on the figures and release them, it is virtually always without caveat or consideration of the problems in the numbers. Then, when the media gets ahold of them, its even worse. We were fortunate this year in that there was a reporter in our state who took the time to look into the nature of maltreatment fatality data, and wrote a follow-up article which was appropriately entitled "No good deed goes unpunished." In it, he described how states that use particularly diligent or thorough case finding for maltreatment fatalities regularly expose themselves to condemnation in the media.

>

> Mark

>

> ______________________________________

> From: Greg & Karen Rice [miami72embarqmail.com]

> Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2009 9:26 AM

> Subject: Re: Rise in CM fatalities and classification of neglectful drownings

>

> In PA, this would be referred to as Imminent Risk, which is a type of child abuse resulting in serious physical injury (death included) or sexual abuse/exploitation due to neglect.

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: Finkelhor, David

> To: Jones, Lisa (FRL) ; riccilaol.com ; riccilaol.com ; Ying-Ying Yuan ; cnolanacf.dhhs.gov ; alexanrmsm.edu ; child-maltreatment-research-Lcornell.edu

> Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2009 7:08 AM

> Subject: Rise in CM fatalities and classification of neglectful drownings

>

> In a NYT article today a Florida CWS administrator explained a recent rise in CM fatalities there to a new tendency to count drowning due to neglect as a CM fatality. The 2007 NCCANDS data showed a 15% rise in CM fatalities and increases in quite a few states. Does anyone of a sense that this is drowning classification change is something that extends beyond Florida

>

> David Finkelhor

> Crimes against Children Research Center

> Family Research Laboratory

> Department of Sociology, University of New Hampshire

> Durham, NH 03824

> Tel 603 862-2761* Fax 603 862-1122

> email: david.finkelhorunh.edu

>

> My new book has been released. Click on it for more details and to order.

>

> [cid:4C427FF9F34F4610AA86DE8957822A67DESKTOP]

>

>

>

> http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/

> http://www.unh.edu/frl/

>

>

> From: emailthisms3.lga2.nytimes.com [mailto:emailthisms3.lga2.nytimes.com] On Behalf Of david.finkelhorunh.edu

> Sent: 2009-07-25 06:54

> To: Finkelhor, David

> Subject: NYTimes.com: Florida Shifts Child-Welfare System's Focus to Saving Families

>

>

>

>

>

> [http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/apps/emailthis/head_1.gif][http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/apps/emailthis/head_2.gif][http://graphics8.nytimes.com/adx/images/ADS/20/63/ad.206326/500days_nytimes_88x31_NP.gif]

>

>

>

>

>

> This page was sent to you by: david.finkelhorunh.edu

>

> US | July 25, 2009

> Florida Shifts Child-Welfare System's Focus to Saving Families

> By ERIK ECKHOLM

> Officials in Florida shifted spending of federal foster care aid to focus on keeping families intact and to finance prevention and mental health treatment.

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> [http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/apps/emailthis/todays.gif]

> 1. Stock Traders Find Speed Pays, in Milliseconds

> 2. The Minimalist: 101 Simple Salads for the Season

> 3. Op-Ed Columnist: Costs and Compassion

> 4. 44 Charged by U.S. in New Jersey Corruption Sweep

> 5. Op-Ed Columnist: Kill the Rhinos!

>

> » Go to Complete List

>

>

>

>

> Advertisement

>

>

> Adam The story of two strangers, one a little stranger than the other. Starring Hugh Dancy and Rose Byrne. In theaters this summer.

> Click here to view trailer

>

> [http://graphics8.nytimes.com/adx/images/ADS/20/17/ad.201742/adam_120x60.gif]

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Copyright 2009 The New York Times Company | Privacy Policy

>

>

>

> [http://www.mailscanner.tv/1x1spacer.gif]

>

>

>

>

>