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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8192
Date: 2009-07-13

Author:Randi Rubenstein

Subject:RE: Working with Young Males in Probation to Prevent Child Abuse

Hi Scott,



My non-profit organization, Education for Successful Parenting, has

developed a curriculum for young adults, especially targeting adolescents

before they conceive a child. We've been implementing the program in

Southern California among a variety youth audiences and settings, including

probation males. In fact, probation males have been our best audiences in

terms of active participation and genuine interest. We are working with

RAND Corporation to conduct a formal evaluation. Please feel free to call

me or visit our website (contact info below signature) for more information.



One of the topics we specifically address is Shaken Baby Syndrome. For this

particular topic I would like to direct you to two expert resources.



1- www.dontshake.org - National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome - They offer

excellent educational materials that are evidence-based for improving

caregiver response to crying infants. Dr. Barr's research indicates a period

of inconsolable crying among infants, and once parents understand and accept

this as normal, they can cope better. Their website offers DVDs and scripts

for educators that guide caregivers in handling crying infants.



2 - www.thehappiestbaby.org - The Happiest Baby, Inc. - Dr. Karp has

produced a DVD called "The Happiest Baby" which offers several techniques

for calming an infant. My experience in showing this video to young males

is that they really respond to seeing a male role model confidently handle

an infant, and the techniques provide them with alternative responses. Many

social service agencies are using this visit especially with home-visits to

at-risk families. In our ESP classes, after male probationers view the

video, they are actually eager for an opportunity to practice swaddling and

the other techniques on a doll, and look forward to trying them with a real

crying infant. This is a complete reversal of their prior attitudes towards

crying infants, and that is probably very beneficial.



Two important additional thoughts:



1. Dr. Karp's work is enormously popular in the general public, but it is

not as yet evidence-based. Although he asserts that it can work almost

every time, in the event that an infant is not consoled by his techniques,

it would be good for caretakers to be aware of Dr. Barr's work that

indicates some infants simply cry more than others.



2. In my experience with probation youth, I find that many of them first

need to understand basic infant needs. Neither of the above approaches

would be appropriate if the caregiver hasn't first considered whether the

infant has a need that must be met - feeding, diaper change, hot/cold, etc.

It's not uncommon for probation youth to have unrealistic expectations.

"The baby can't be hungry - I just fed her three hours ago." (I really heard

this from one teen Mom.)



Let me know if I can be of further assistance. You are addressing a vitally

important risk to children.



Randi Rubenstein, MS Public Health

Executive Director

Education for Successful Parenting

www.eduparents.org

(949) 646-6016





-----Original Message-----

From: bounce-4085538-6833987@list.cornell.edu

[mailto:bounce-4085538-6833987@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Scott Bates

Sent: Friday, July 10, 2009 3:02 PM

To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu

Subject: Working with Young Males in Probation to Prevent Child Abuse



Hello All-



I sit on the Child Abuse subcommittee of the Colorado Child Fatality

Prevention group and we have noticed a trend over the years of young male

caretakers with little or no experience caring for infants perpetrating

child abuse (via shaking or throwing of the child) when frustrated with

crying children. This often leads to death or irreparable damage. One county

in Colorado has already experienced 16 deaths this year of children in this

situation.



Even though this phenomenon has been known for some time, we have been at a

loss about how best to reach these young males who are often not attending

school.



So, we have recently teamed up with juvenile probation folks to reach this

population and to make caretaking training a part of their successful

completion of probation - whether or not they have children of their own.



By the way, we already did some digging in the data to see if there was a

correlation between perpetrators of child abuse resulting in fatality and

males involved in the probation system and found that we didn't have enough

to analyze.



I am wondering if any of you folks have tried a similar approach in your

area and/or if you have perspectives about working with this population that

may help to inform our project. We are only in the nascent stages, so your

opinions can really help to guide us!



Thanks - and thanks for years of wonderful discussion and feedback!



Scott Bates, MSW

Director

Colorado Children's Trust Fund

Family Resource Centers

Colorado Dept. of Public Health and Environment









Hi Scott,



My non-profit organization, Education for Successful Parenting, has

developed a curriculum for young adults, especially targeting adolescents

before they conceive a child. We've been implementing the program in

Southern California among a variety youth audiences and settings, including

probation males. In fact, probation males have been our best audiences in

terms of active participation and genuine interest. We are working with

RAND Corporation to conduct a formal evaluation. Please feel free to call

me or visit our website (contact info below signature) for more information.



One of the topics we specifically address is Shaken Baby Syndrome. For this

particular topic I would like to direct you to two expert resources.



1- www.dontshake.org - National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome - They offer

excellent educational materials that are evidence-based for improving

caregiver response to crying infants. Dr. Barr's research indicates a period

of inconsolable crying among infants, and once parents understand and accept

this as normal, they can cope better. Their website offers DVDs and scripts

for educators that guide caregivers in handling crying infants.



2 - www.thehappiestbaby.org - The Happiest Baby, Inc. - Dr. Karp has

produced a DVD called "The Happiest Baby" which offers several techniques

for calming an infant. My experience in showing this video to young males

is that they really respond to seeing a male role model confidently handle

an infant, and the techniques provide them with alternative responses. Many

social service agencies are using this visit especially with home-visits to

at-risk families. In our ESP classes, after male probationers view the

video, they are actually eager for an opportunity to practice swaddling and

the other techniques on a doll, and look forward to trying them with a real

crying infant. This is a complete reversal of their prior attitudes towards

crying infants, and that is probably very beneficial.



Two important additional thoughts:



1. Dr. Karp's work is enormously popular in the general public, but it is

not as yet evidence-based. Although he asserts that it can work almost

every time, in the event that an infant is not consoled by his techniques,

it would be good for caretakers to be aware of Dr. Barr's work that

indicates some infants simply cry more than others.



2. In my experience with probation youth, I find that many of them first

need to understand basic infant needs. Neither of the above approaches

would be appropriate if the caregiver hasn't first considered whether the

infant has a need that must be met - feeding, diaper change, hot/cold, etc.

It's not uncommon for probation youth to have unrealistic expectations.

"The baby can't be hungry - I just fed her three hours ago." (I really heard

this from one teen Mom.)



Let me know if I can be of further assistance. You are addressing a vitally

important risk to children.



Randi Rubenstein, MS Public Health

Executive Director

Education for Successful Parenting

www.eduparents.org

(949) 646-6016





-----Original Message-----

From: bounce-4085538-6833987list.cornell.edu

[mailto:bounce-4085538-6833987list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Scott Bates

Sent: Friday, July 10, 2009 3:02 PM

To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu

Subject: Working with Young Males in Probation to Prevent Child Abuse



Hello All-



I sit on the Child Abuse subcommittee of the Colorado Child Fatality

Prevention group and we have noticed a trend over the years of young male

caretakers with little or no experience caring for infants perpetrating

child abuse (via shaking or throwing of the child) when frustrated with

crying children. This often leads to death or irreparable damage. One county

in Colorado has already experienced 16 deaths this year of children in this

situation.



Even though this phenomenon has been known for some time, we have been at a

loss about how best to reach these young males who are often not attending

school.



So, we have recently teamed up with juvenile probation folks to reach this

population and to make caretaking training a part of their successful

completion of probation - whether or not they have children of their own.



By the way, we already did some digging in the data to see if there was a

correlation between perpetrators of child abuse resulting in fatality and

males involved in the probation system and found that we didn't have enough

to analyze.



I am wondering if any of you folks have tried a similar approach in your

area and/or if you have perspectives about working with this population that

may help to inform our project. We are only in the nascent stages, so your

opinions can really help to guide us!



Thanks - and thanks for years of wonderful discussion and feedback!



Scott Bates, MSW

Director

Colorado Children's Trust Fund

Family Resource Centers

Colorado Dept. of Public Health and Environment