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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - June 11, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8185
Date: 2009-06-05

Author:aron shlonsky

Subject:Re: how to calculate an effect size

David Wilson's website has a wealth of info and a free ES calculator.

Aron



Jill Levenson, Ph.D. wrote:

>

> Here is a very good website discussing in simple terms the basic

> concepts of power analysis. Cohen did provide guidelines for

> interpreting effect sizes for comparisons and correlations. I use

> GPower and find it to be very helpful. You can download it for free.

>

>

>

> Jill Levenson, Ph.D., LCSW

>

> Fort Lauderdale, FL

>

>

>

> *From:* bounce-3988070-6833436@list.cornell.edu

> [mailto:bounce-3988070-6833436@list.cornell.edu] *On Behalf Of *Todd

> McDonald

> *Sent:* Thursday, June 04, 2009 1:53 PM

> *To:* Child Maltreatment Researchers

> *Subject:* RE: how to calculate an effect size

>

>

>

> Dr. Koh

>

>

>

> Thank you for the web page. This seems to be limited to when you

> compare two means. Is that correct? What about when you have a

> logistic regression model? Should I just use the odds ratio as the

> effect size?

>

>

>

> TM

>

>

>

>

>

> --- On *Wed, 6/3/09, Eun Koh //* wrote:

>

>

> From: Eun Koh

> Subject: RE: how to calculate an effect size

> To: "'Child Maltreatment Researchers'"

>

> Date: Wednesday, June 3, 2009, 5:16 PM

>

> I recently looked into the issue of effect size, and hopefully,

> this site will help:

>

>

>

> http://web.uccs.edu/lbecker/Psy590/es.htm

>

>

>

> It is noted in the above site, but again many people refer to

> Cohen's article when discussing the size (small, medium, large) of

> effect size: Cohen (1988). Statistical power analysis for the

> behavior sciences (second ed.).

>

>

>

> Hope this helps.

>

>

>

> Eun

>

>

>

> Eun Koh

>

> Postdoctoral Research Associate

>

> Children and Family Research Center

>

> School of Social Work

>

> University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

>

> Tel) 312-641-2505 (ext.18)

>

> E-mail) eunkoh@illinois.edu

>

>

>

>

>

>

> ------------------------------------------------------------------------

>

> *From:* bounce-3984573-9402306@list.cornell.edu

> [mailto:bounce-3984573-9402306@list.cornell.edu] *On Behalf Of

> *Todd McDonald

> *Sent:* Wednesday, June 03, 2009 2:01 PM

> *To:* Child Maltreatment Researchers

> *Cc:* jmpolstra@att.net

> *Subject:* how to calculate an effect size

>

> I notice some of the journal articles use very large samples. Is

> there a way to calculate an effect size from a crosstabs table and

> a logistic regression table? Is there a rule on what is

> considered a big effect?

>

>

>

> TM

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>



--

Aron Shlonsky

Associate Professor

Factor-Inwentash Chair in Child Welfare

University of Toronto

Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work

246 Bloor St. W.

Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1

Canada

Phone: (416) 978-5718

Fax: (416) 978-7072

email: aron.shlonsky@utoronto.ca



Keep up with the latest child welfare news: sign up for Research Watch on CECW's website at http://www.cecw-cepb.ca/researchwatch_e.html !







David Wilson's website has a wealth of info and a free ES calculator.

Aron



Jill Levenson, Ph.D. wrote:

>

> Here is a very good website discussing in simple terms the basic

> concepts of power analysis. Cohen did provide guidelines for

> interpreting effect sizes for comparisons and correlations. I use

> GPower and find it to be very helpful. You can download it for free.

>

>

>

> Jill Levenson, Ph.D., LCSW

>

> Fort Lauderdale, FL

>

>

>

> *From:* bounce-3988070-6833436list.cornell.edu

> [mailto:bounce-3988070-6833436list.cornell.edu] *On Behalf Of *Todd

> McDonald

> *Sent:* Thursday, June 04, 2009 1:53 PM

> *To:* Child Maltreatment Researchers

> *Subject:* RE: how to calculate an effect size

>

>

>

> Dr. Koh

>

>

>

> Thank you for the web page. This seems to be limited to when you

> compare two means. Is that correct? What about when you have a

> logistic regression model? Should I just use the odds ratio as the

> effect size?

>

>

>

> TM

>

>

>

>

>

> --- On *Wed, 6/3/09, Eun Koh //* wrote:

>

>

> From: Eun Koh

> Subject: RE: how to calculate an effect size

> To: "'Child Maltreatment Researchers'"

>

> Date: Wednesday, June 3, 2009, 5:16 PM

>

> I recently looked into the issue of effect size, and hopefully,

> this site will help:

>

>

>

> http://web.uccs.edu/lbecker/Psy590/es.htm

>

>

>

> It is noted in the above site, but again many people refer to

> Cohen's article when discussing the size (small, medium, large) of

> effect size: Cohen (1988). Statistical power analysis for the

> behavior sciences (second ed.).

>

>

>

> Hope this helps.

>

>

>

> Eun

>

>

>

> Eun Koh

>

> Postdoctoral Research Associate

>

> Children and Family Research Center

>

> School of Social Work

>

> University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

>

> Tel) 312-641-2505 (ext.18)

>

> E-mail) eunkohillinois.edu

>

>

>

>

>

>

> ------------------------------------------------------------------------

>

> *From:* bounce-3984573-9402306list.cornell.edu

> [mailto:bounce-3984573-9402306list.cornell.edu] *On Behalf Of

> *Todd McDonald

> *Sent:* Wednesday, June 03, 2009 2:01 PM

> *To:* Child Maltreatment Researchers

> *Cc:* jmpolstraatt.net

> *Subject:* how to calculate an effect size

>

> I notice some of the journal articles use very large samples. Is

> there a way to calculate an effect size from a crosstabs table and

> a logistic regression table? Is there a rule on what is

> considered a big effect?

>

>

>

> TM

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>



--

Aron Shlonsky

Associate Professor

Factor-Inwentash Chair in Child Welfare

University of Toronto

Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work

246 Bloor St. W.

Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1

Canada

Phone: (416) 978-5718

Fax: (416) 978-7072

email: aron.shlonskyutoronto.ca



Keep up with the latest child welfare news: sign up for Research Watch on CECW's website at http://www.cecw-cepb.ca/researchwatch_e.html !