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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8110
Date: 2009-04-04

Author:NCCPRaol.com

Subject:Re: child maltreatment declines 12% 2006-2007

I assume the question refers to this chart: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/pubs/cm07/table3_3.htm If so, the apparent change in Florida reflects a change in the way the state is reporting its data. In the “State Commentary” section of the report, available here, http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/pubs/cm07/appendd.htm Florida’s entry says: "Beginning with the FFY 2007 NCANDS submission, all reports with a disposition of "some indication" were mapped to the NCANDS category "other." This resulted in a change in the number of substantiated reports. The State believes it is appropriate to separate these reports from those mapped to substantiated as there is not a preponderance of credible evidence that abuse or neglect occurred." In addition, a check of the “Child Welfare Services Trend Report” available as part of an excellent database funded by the Florida Department of Children and Families (http://centerforchildwelfare.fmhi.usf.edu/kb/default.aspx) shows that when reports labeled substantiated (Florida uses the term “verified”) and “some indication” are combined, the total is quite close to previous years. As a practical matter, the change appears to make Florida’s definition of a victim of child maltreatment more consistent with the rest of the nation. When Florida reported the combined figure, year after year it had the highest rate of victimization in the country � by a significant mmargin (The one exception: Alaska in 2003). Now the figure remains above the national average, but is much closer to that average. Richard Wexler Executive Director National Coalition for Child Protection Reform 53 Skyhill Road (Suite 202) Alexandria VA 22314 703-212-2006 www.nccpr.org In a message dated 4/3/2009 9:32:37 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, ntarui@gmail.com writes: The "largest single year decline" in the matlreatment rate from 2006-07 appears to be driven by a large decline in the maltreatment rate in one state--Florida (from 33.4 per 1,000 children in 2006 to 13.2 in 2007, or 134,567 victims out of 4,032,726 in 2006 to 53,484 out of 4,043,560 children in 2007--a 60% decline in the number of victims). If we exclude Florid when computing the national average victimization rate, we find that it has been decreasing only slightly (10.9,10.8, 10,9, 10.8, 10.4 for 2003-2007). I would appreciate it if someone could tell us what explains the substantial decline in (reported) maltreatment in Florida. Best wishes, and thank you David for the information. Nori Nori Tarui Assistant Professor Department of Economics, University of Hawai'i at Manoa nori.tarui@hawaii.edu On Fri, Apr 3, 2009 at 8:45 AM, Finkelhor, David > wrote: The Administration of Children Youth and Families released 2007 child maltreatment numbers on April 1, but it did not make the news in any of the places that I track, despite the fact that it shows a one year drop of 12% for all forms of maltreatment, which is the largest single year decline that has even occurred. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/news/press/2009/child_maltreatment_report_07.html Here’s the release with links to the report. David David Finkelhor Crimes against Children Research Center Family Research Laboratory Department of Sociology, University of New Hampshire Durham, NH 03824 Tel 603 862-2761* Fax 603 862-1122 email: david.finkelhor@unh.edu http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/ http://www.unh.edu/frl/ My new book is now available. To see more or order it, click on the cover below. ******************************************************* "Sexual abuse is down 5% and physical abuse down 3% in the most recent NCANDS data." See update on new 2006 child maltreatment trends: http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/ -- ---------- Nori Tarui, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Economics, University of Hawai'i at Manoa 2424 Maile Way, 518 Saunders Hall Honolulu, HI 96822 USA Phone: (808)956-8427 Fax: (808)956-4347 nori.tarui@hawaii.edu ________________________________ Feeling the pinch at the grocery store? Make dinner for $10 or less . Content-ID: Content-Type: image/jpeg; name="image003.jpg" Content-Disposition: inline;

I assume the question refers to this chart: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/pubs/cm07/table3_3.htm If so, the apparent change in Florida reflects a change in the way the state is reporting its data. In the “State Commentary” section of the report, available here, http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/pubs/cm07/appendd.htm Florida’s entry says: "Beginning with the FFY 2007 NCANDS submission, all reports with a disposition of "some indication" were mapped to the NCANDS category "other." This resulted in a change in the number of substantiated reports. The State believes it is appropriate to separate these reports from those mapped to substantiated as there is not a preponderance of credible evidence that abuse or neglect occurred." In addition, a check of the “Child Welfare Services Trend Report” available as part of an excellent database funded by the Florida Department of Children and Families (http://centerforchildwelfare.fmhi.usf.edu/kb/default.aspx) shows that when reports labeled substantiated (Florida uses the term “verified”) and “some indication” are combined, the total is quite close to previous years. As a practical matter, the change appears to make Florida’s definition of a victim of child maltreatment more consistent with the rest of the nation. When Florida reported the combined figure, year after year it had the highest rate of victimization in the country � by a significant mmargin (The one exception: Alaska in 2003). Now the figure remains above the national average, but is much closer to that average. Richard Wexler Executive Director National Coalition for Child Protection Reform 53 Skyhill Road (Suite 202) Alexandria VA 22314 703-212-2006 www.nccpr.org In a message dated 4/3/2009 9:32:37 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, ntaruigmail.com writes: The "largest single year decline" in the matlreatment rate from 2006-07 appears to be driven by a large decline in the maltreatment rate in one state--Florida (from 33.4 per 1,000 children in 2006 to 13.2 in 2007, or 134,567 victims out of 4,032,726 in 2006 to 53,484 out of 4,043,560 children in 2007--a 60% decline in the number of victims). If we exclude Florid when computing the national average victimization rate, we find that it has been decreasing only slightly (10.9,10.8, 10,9, 10.8, 10.4 for 2003-2007). I would appreciate it if someone could tell us what explains the substantial decline in (reported) maltreatment in Florida. Best wishes, and thank you David for the information. Nori Nori Tarui Assistant Professor Department of Economics, University of Hawai'i at Manoa nori.taruihawaii.edu On Fri, Apr 3, 2009 at 8:45 AM, Finkelhor, David > wrote: The Administration of Children Youth and Families released 2007 child maltreatment numbers on April 1, but it did not make the news in any of the places that I track, despite the fact that it shows a one year drop of 12% for all forms of maltreatment, which is the largest single year decline that has even occurred. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/news/press/2009/child_maltreatment_report_07.html Here’s the release with links to the report. David David Finkelhor Crimes against Children Research Center Family Research Laboratory Department of Sociology, University of New Hampshire Durham, NH 03824 Tel 603 862-2761* Fax 603 862-1122 email: david.finkelhorunh.edu http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/ http://www.unh.edu/frl/ My new book is now available. To see more or order it, click on the cover below. ******************************************************* "Sexual abuse is down 5% and physical abuse down 3% in the most recent NCANDS data." See update on new 2006 child maltreatment trends: http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/ -- ---------- Nori Tarui, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Economics, University of Hawai'i at Manoa 2424 Maile Way, 518 Saunders Hall Honolulu, HI 96822 USA Phone: (808)956-8427 Fax: (808)956-4347 nori.taruihawaii.edu ________________________________ Feeling the pinch at the grocery store? Make dinner for $10 or less . Content-ID: Content-Type: image/jpeg; name="image003.jpg" Content-Disposition: inline;