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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8066
Date: 2009-03-04

Author:Chaffin, Mark J. (HSC)

Subject:RE: screening questions for assessing sexual victimization

Hi David, Just a couple of suggestions. Ben Saunders and colleagues had a set of questions used for the National Women’s Study (“Rape in America”). Phone survey. The good things about these questions is that they were behaviorally explicit in what they were asking about, and asked mostly about clear-cut sexual assault types of experiences (not so much the arbitrary age differences or “made you feel uncomfortable” sort of stuff). The upshot of this is that the data could be a bit more precise and comparisons across time might vary less depending on subjective interpretation. The definitions they used resulted in lower prevalence than some of the broader definitions out there, but still not too low, and the types of events they captured in reports had a strong association with mental health outcomes. David Finkelhor and colleagues have an instrument that they’ve used in large phone surveys, the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire. More designed for teenagers than young adults I think, and covers lots of criminal victimization areas. Mark Mark Chaffin, Ph.D. Professor of Pediatrics University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center P.O. Box 26901; CSC 225 Oklahoma City, OK 73190 (405) 271-8858 Confidentiality Notice This email, including any attachments, contains information from [insert name of College/Department/Clinic], which may be confidential or privileged. The information is intended to be for the use of the individual or entity named above. If you are not the intended recipient, be aware that any disclosure, copying, distribution or use of the contents of this information is prohibited. If you have received this email in error, please notify the sender immediately by a “reply to sender only” message and destroy all electronic and hard copies of the communication, including attachments. From: David DiLillo [mailto:ddilillo@unlserve.unl.edu] Sent: Friday, February 27, 2009 9:25 PM Subject: screening questions for assessing sexual victimization Colleagues, I am looking for screening questions to assess sexual victimization occurring prior to age 18. These questions will be used in a telephone survey of women between the ages of 18 and 25. I am simply looking to assess the presence or absence of victimization with as few false negatives as possible. Can anyone direct me to a set of questions that has been used successfully for this purpose (e.g., in one of the large national surveys)? Much appreciation in advance for any assistance. David DiLillo, Ph.D. Associate Professor & Director of Clinical Training Department of Psychology 238 Burnett Hall University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, NE 68588-0308 Phone: (402) 472-3297 Fax: (402) 472-4637 Lab: http://www.unl.edu/psypage/fvi/

Hi David, Just a couple of suggestions. Ben Saunders and colleagues had a set of questions used for the National Women’s Study (“Rape in America”). Phone survey. The good things about these questions is that they were behaviorally explicit in what they were asking about, and asked mostly about clear-cut sexual assault types of experiences (not so much the arbitrary age differences or “made you feel uncomfortable” sort of stuff). The upshot of this is that the data could be a bit more precise and comparisons across time might vary less depending on subjective interpretation. The definitions they used resulted in lower prevalence than some of the broader definitions out there, but still not too low, and the types of events they captured in reports had a strong association with mental health outcomes. David Finkelhor and colleagues have an instrument that they’ve used in large phone surveys, the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire. More designed for teenagers than young adults I think, and covers lots of criminal victimization areas. Mark Mark Chaffin, Ph.D. Professor of Pediatrics University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center P.O. Box 26901; CSC 225 Oklahoma City, OK 73190 (405) 271-8858 Confidentiality Notice This email, including any attachments, contains information from [insert name of College/Department/Clinic], which may be confidential or privileged. The information is intended to be for the use of the individual or entity named above. If you are not the intended recipient, be aware that any disclosure, copying, distribution or use of the contents of this information is prohibited. If you have received this email in error, please notify the sender immediately by a “reply to sender only” message and destroy all electronic and hard copies of the communication, including attachments. From: David DiLillo [mailto:ddilillounlserve.unl.edu] Sent: Friday, February 27, 2009 9:25 PM Subject: screening questions for assessing sexual victimization Colleagues, I am looking for screening questions to assess sexual victimization occurring prior to age 18. These questions will be used in a telephone survey of women between the ages of 18 and 25. I am simply looking to assess the presence or absence of victimization with as few false negatives as possible. Can anyone direct me to a set of questions that has been used successfully for this purpose (e.g., in one of the large national surveys)? Much appreciation in advance for any assistance. David DiLillo, Ph.D. Associate Professor & Director of Clinical Training Department of Psychology 238 Burnett Hall University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, NE 68588-0308 Phone: (402) 472-3297 Fax: (402) 472-4637 Lab: http://www.unl.edu/psypage/fvi/