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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8045
Date: 2009-01-27

Author:Friend, Colleen

Subject:RE: Extended Forensic Interviews

Eric, I think we have to have some level of confidence and yet some level of humbleness with our “accuracy” knowledge in any outcome, not just disclosure. My understanding was that in this research, Chadwick/Rady turned over its findings to San Diego CPS and they ( CPS) determined the outcome. Again, I am just relaying what was reported in a presentation; contact Laurie Fortin, LCSW for more complete information. Thanks, CF Colleen Friend, Ph.D., LCSW Director Child Abuse and Family Violence Institute Department of Communication Disorders Office (323) 343-4696 Fax (323) 343-5616 www.calstatela.edu/academic/hhs/cafvi ________________________________ From: bounce-3496086-8269919@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-3496086-8269919@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Eric Mart Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2009 6:49 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Extended Forensic Interviews Collen, How did they know they had accurate disclosures? Eric G. Mart, Ph.D., ABPP (Forensic) 311 Highlander Way Manchester, New Hampshire 03103 Ph. 603/626-0966 Fax 603/622-7012 www.psychology-law.com ----- Original Message ----- From: Friend, Colleen To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Sent: Friday, January 23, 2009 9:35 PM Subject: RE: Extended Forensic Interviews Shelly and Eric, I think it would be important to check out the work done on EFEs by Laurie Fortin and her colleagues at the Chadwick Center, Rady Children’s Hospital. She presented the approach and the data at our Southern California Consortium of CAC’s meeting in September, 2008. They conducted a small study in 07-08 with 8 interviewers and 28 children. They got disclosures of abuse in 39%, ruled out abuse in 22% and had an indeterminate outcome in 39%. Being able to reach a conclusion in 61% of these difficult cases is a successful outcome. Perhaps as important, was their ability to identify the services the children needed and get them connected to those services. Other California CACs have grants to study this model in their communities. I think we need to have options for children who for multiple reasons, just are not able or willing to describe their experience in a single forensic or field interview, if indeed anything happened at all. Thanks, CF Colleen Friend, Ph.D., LCSW Director Child Abuse and Family Violence Institute Department of Communication Disorders Office (323) 343-4696 Fax (323) 343-5616 www.calstatela.edu/academic/hhs/cafvi ________________________________ From: bounce-3494722-8269919@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-3494722-8269919@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Eric G. Mart Sent: Friday, January 23, 2009 12:05 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Extended Forensic Interviews Shelly, I wouldn't do them without a darn good reason. I think it is important to remember that everyone doing CSA assessments is going to have their methodology and performance assessed with regard to the extent to which it comports with the Lamb et al NICHD protocol, and that does not included repeated interviewing. In the absence of any actually empirical proof that extended forensic assessment improves accurate recall without increasing errors, I'd avoid the practice. Eric G. Mart, Ph.D., ABPP (Forensic) 311 Highlander Way Manchester, New Hampshire 03103 Ph. 603/626-0966 Fax 603/622-7012 www.psychology-law.com ----- Original Message ----- From: Jackson, Shelly L *HS To: 'Child Maltreatment Researchers' Sent: Friday, January 23, 2009 8:13 AM Subject: Extended Forensic Interviews I would like ask the research and the practitioner communities to weigh in on a debate about extended forensic interviews (EFEs). We are in the midst of a debate in our community and I would like to hear what other communities are doing. I am familiar with the literature, but I’d like to hear researcher’s assessments of that research base. I’d also like to learn what practitioners in other communities are doing or thinking about in terms of EFEs. Thanks so much. ________________________________

Eric, I think we have to have some level of confidence and yet some level of humbleness with our “accuracy” knowledge in any outcome, not just disclosure. My understanding was that in this research, Chadwick/Rady turned over its findings to San Diego CPS and they ( CPS) determined the outcome. Again, I am just relaying what was reported in a presentation; contact Laurie Fortin, LCSW for more complete information. Thanks, CF Colleen Friend, Ph.D., LCSW Director Child Abuse and Family Violence Institute Department of Communication Disorders Office (323) 343-4696 Fax (323) 343-5616 www.calstatela.edu/academic/hhs/cafvi ________________________________ From: bounce-3496086-8269919list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-3496086-8269919list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Eric Mart Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2009 6:49 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Extended Forensic Interviews Collen, How did they know they had accurate disclosures? Eric G. Mart, Ph.D., ABPP (Forensic) 311 Highlander Way Manchester, New Hampshire 03103 Ph. 603/626-0966 Fax 603/622-7012 www.psychology-law.com ----- Original Message ----- From: Friend, Colleen To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Sent: Friday, January 23, 2009 9:35 PM Subject: RE: Extended Forensic Interviews Shelly and Eric, I think it would be important to check out the work done on EFEs by Laurie Fortin and her colleagues at the Chadwick Center, Rady Children’s Hospital. She presented the approach and the data at our Southern California Consortium of CAC’s meeting in September, 2008. They conducted a small study in 07-08 with 8 interviewers and 28 children. They got disclosures of abuse in 39%, ruled out abuse in 22% and had an indeterminate outcome in 39%. Being able to reach a conclusion in 61% of these difficult cases is a successful outcome. Perhaps as important, was their ability to identify the services the children needed and get them connected to those services. Other California CACs have grants to study this model in their communities. I think we need to have options for children who for multiple reasons, just are not able or willing to describe their experience in a single forensic or field interview, if indeed anything happened at all. Thanks, CF Colleen Friend, Ph.D., LCSW Director Child Abuse and Family Violence Institute Department of Communication Disorders Office (323) 343-4696 Fax (323) 343-5616 www.calstatela.edu/academic/hhs/cafvi ________________________________ From: bounce-3494722-8269919list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-3494722-8269919list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Eric G. Mart Sent: Friday, January 23, 2009 12:05 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Extended Forensic Interviews Shelly, I wouldn't do them without a darn good reason. I think it is important to remember that everyone doing CSA assessments is going to have their methodology and performance assessed with regard to the extent to which it comports with the Lamb et al NICHD protocol, and that does not included repeated interviewing. In the absence of any actually empirical proof that extended forensic assessment improves accurate recall without increasing errors, I'd avoid the practice. Eric G. Mart, Ph.D., ABPP (Forensic) 311 Highlander Way Manchester, New Hampshire 03103 Ph. 603/626-0966 Fax 603/622-7012 www.psychology-law.com ----- Original Message ----- From: Jackson, Shelly L *HS To: 'Child Maltreatment Researchers' Sent: Friday, January 23, 2009 8:13 AM Subject: Extended Forensic Interviews I would like ask the research and the practitioner communities to weigh in on a debate about extended forensic interviews (EFEs). We are in the midst of a debate in our community and I would like to hear what other communities are doing. I am familiar with the literature, but I’d like to hear researcher’s assessments of that research base. I’d also like to learn what practitioners in other communities are doing or thinking about in terms of EFEs. Thanks so much. ________________________________