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Message ID: 7947
Date: 2008-12-11

Author:Sherrill Clark

Subject:RE: child maltreatment and economic hard times

Chapin Hall just came out with a new report examining the financial

resources of foster (including kincare) parents in Illinois which is

relevant to this topic also:



Smithgall, C., DeCoursey, J., & Goerge, R. (2008) Does money matter? Foster

parenting and

family finances. Chicago: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago



There are some references to what they call financial strain and how that

affects families and child development issues.



Sherrill Clark



-----Original Message-----

From: bounce-3378802-7059115@list.cornell.edu

[mailto:bounce-3378802-7059115@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of

lfontes@rcn.com

Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2008 5:15 PM

To: Child Maltreatment Researchers

Subject: RE: child maltreatment and economic hard times



To folow up on Sherrill Clark's thought, some local examples that might

increase the possibility of abuse/neglect do not even concern social service

agencies per se:

* In our area one city public library was closed down and others have

greatly reduced hours due to budget cuts. The community library serves as a

source of safe childcare for families who don't have a lot of options.

Instead, the kids are left at home alone.

* afterschool and before-school programs are shut down.

* public schools cut back from fullday kindergarten to half-day. Extended

hours are possible--at a cost

* health clinic stops holding Saturday hours, requiring patients to access

emergency rooms with long waits, which undoubtedly makes some parents just

"wait until Monday."

* budget cutbacks make agencies reduce their use of interpreters or rely on

problematic telephone interpreting services.

* caretakers post-pone "elective" medical procedures for themselves and

their children, both directly and indirectly impacting children's

well-being.

* reduced availability of drug & alcohol treatment programs

* lack of jobs that pay a living wage causes caretakers to hold multiple

positions and neglect their children



I could go on and on but this is mighty depressing! Let's hope the new year

brings better times for all.

Lisa Fontes, Ph.D.



---- Original message ----

>Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2008 11:27:39 -0800

>From: "Sherrill Clark"

>Subject: RE: child maltreatment and economic hard times

>To: "'Child Maltreatment Researchers'"

>

>Cc: ,"'Ying-Ying Yuan'"

>

>

>In addition to family characteristics, we might also consider that in

>economic hard times there are fewer resources available to families

>(staff losses due to budget cuts, non profits that go out of business,

>change their focus, close storefront community-based centers, or the

>cost of services to families goes up and become unaffordable.for

>example) to prevent distress that reaches the maltreatment level. This

>is a more policy-focused perspective that doesn't target the families'

deficits per se.

>

>Sherrill Clark

>CalSWEC

>

> _____

>

>From: bounce-3362146-7059115@list.cornell.edu

>[mailto:bounce-3362146-7059115@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of

>Brodowski, Melissa (ACF)

>Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2008 8:36 PM

>To: Child Maltreatment Researchers

>Cc: sbates@smtpgate.dphe.state.co.us; Ying-Ying Yuan

>Subject: RE: child maltreatment and economic hard times

>

>

>Hi everyone -

>

>I have a couple of related questions to Tom Hanna's posting. Our CAPTA

>Title II state prevention grantee from Colorado is working on a project

>examining increases in violence (child maltreatment, sexual assault,

>suicide and unintentional injury) during hard economic times -- quite

>timely right now.

>

>We know there's data and research showing the linkages between poverty

>and child maltreatment (and being at-risk). The National Incidence

>Study-3 findings demonstrate that family income was significantly

>related to incidence rates in nearly every category of maltreatment.

>Compared to children whose families earned $30,000 per year or more,

>those in families with annual incomes below $15,000 per year were more

>than 22 times more likely to experience some form of maltreatment under

>the Harm Standard (and over 25 times more likely to suffer maltreatment

>of some type using the Endangerment Standard). This is consistent with

>the findings of many different studies that children do not fare well

>in poorer families compared to nonpoor families. For more information on

NIS-3 visit:

>

>http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/statsinfo/nis3.cfm#family (and NIS-4

>should be coming out soon to update this information)

>

>I also emailed Ying-Ying Yuan who manages the technical assistance

>contract for our National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS).

>She reminded me that in Beyond Common Sense, they showed that in poorer

>counties, there were higher rates of maltreatment. She added that since

>CPS decisions about maltreatment are related to reporting, it is highly

>likely that increases in maltreatment will be found due to poverty IF

reporting increases. In periods

>of economic stress, reporting may increase or it may decrease.

>

>So-- the questions I wanted to pose to the listserve are:

>

>*

>

> Are you aware of any resources/research linking economic hard times

>and increases in child maltreatment? Are there studies that show any

>shifts/ trends in the incidence/ prevalence over time?

>*

>

> Do you have thoughts about whether there might be a decrease in the

>reporting rates and/or child victimization rates because families being

>diverted to other services or because of differential response systems

>for CPS that have developed in many places across the country? Are

>there studies that have examined this?

>

>Thanks for your help with this.

>

>Melissa

>

>Melissa Lim Brodowski, MSW, MPH

>Office on Child Abuse and Neglect

>Children's Bureau, ACYF, ACF, HHS

>1250 Maryland Avenue SW

>Portals Building, 8th Floor #8127

>Washington, DC 20024

>phone: 202-205-2629

>fax: 202-260-9345

>email: melissa.brodowski@acf.hhs.gov

>

>

>

> _____

>

>From: bounce-3361204-6833993@list.cornell.edu on behalf of Tom Hanna

>Sent: Thu 12/4/2008 7:08 PM

>To: child-maltreatment-research-l@cornell.edu

>Subject: What do Today's Neglect Cases Look Like?

>

>

>

>Dear Colleagues:

>

>I have some anecdotal reports that child neglect has recently become a

>bigger issue in some populations, and that the nature of the new

>neglect patterns may relate to "modern" stressors. Nothing specific,

>but I am wondering -- what neglect issues are you seeing or hearing

>about now, and are they any different than what you saw 5 years ago?

>

>Are there any key papers I should be consulting? Especially on shifts

>in incidence patterns, or in proven prevention strategies in direct

>service and/or in public awareness campaigns?

>

>I am hoping to apply what I learn to public awareness campaigns in the

>next few months -- and maybe this will be of use to all of us in

>developing research strategies on both the intervention and prevention

>sides of the neglect picture.

>

>Any input appreciated.

>

>--Thanks

>--Tom

>

>--

>--

>Tom Hanna, Director

>Child Abuse Prevention Network

>www.child-abuse.com

>tom@child-abuse.com

>tph3@cornell.edu

>off 607.275.9360

>cel 607.227.4524

>fax: 415.962.0510

>--

>

>

>

>

>________________

>TNEF20185.rtf (28k bytes)







Chapin Hall just came out with a new report examining the financial

resources of foster (including kincare) parents in Illinois which is

relevant to this topic also:



Smithgall, C., DeCoursey, J., & Goerge, R. (2008) Does money matter? Foster

parenting and

family finances. Chicago: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago



There are some references to what they call financial strain and how that

affects families and child development issues.



Sherrill Clark



-----Original Message-----

From: bounce-3378802-7059115list.cornell.edu

[mailto:bounce-3378802-7059115list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of

lfontesrcn.com

Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2008 5:15 PM

To: Child Maltreatment Researchers

Subject: RE: child maltreatment and economic hard times



To folow up on Sherrill Clark's thought, some local examples that might

increase the possibility of abuse/neglect do not even concern social service

agencies per se:

* In our area one city public library was closed down and others have

greatly reduced hours due to budget cuts. The community library serves as a

source of safe childcare for families who don't have a lot of options.

Instead, the kids are left at home alone.

* afterschool and before-school programs are shut down.

* public schools cut back from fullday kindergarten to half-day. Extended

hours are possible--at a cost

* health clinic stops holding Saturday hours, requiring patients to access

emergency rooms with long waits, which undoubtedly makes some parents just

"wait until Monday."

* budget cutbacks make agencies reduce their use of interpreters or rely on

problematic telephone interpreting services.

* caretakers post-pone "elective" medical procedures for themselves and

their children, both directly and indirectly impacting children's

well-being.

* reduced availability of drug & alcohol treatment programs

* lack of jobs that pay a living wage causes caretakers to hold multiple

positions and neglect their children



I could go on and on but this is mighty depressing! Let's hope the new year

brings better times for all.

Lisa Fontes, Ph.D.



---- Original message ----

>Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2008 11:27:39 -0800

>From: "Sherrill Clark"

>Subject: RE: child maltreatment and economic hard times

>To: "'Child Maltreatment Researchers'"

>

>Cc: ,"'Ying-Ying Yuan'"

>

>

>In addition to family characteristics, we might also consider that in

>economic hard times there are fewer resources available to families

>(staff losses due to budget cuts, non profits that go out of business,

>change their focus, close storefront community-based centers, or the

>cost of services to families goes up and become unaffordable.for

>example) to prevent distress that reaches the maltreatment level. This

>is a more policy-focused perspective that doesn't target the families'

deficits per se.

>

>Sherrill Clark

>CalSWEC

>

> _____

>

>From: bounce-3362146-7059115list.cornell.edu

>[mailto:bounce-3362146-7059115list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of

>Brodowski, Melissa (ACF)

>Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2008 8:36 PM

>To: Child Maltreatment Researchers

>Cc: sbatessmtpgate.dphe.state.co.us; Ying-Ying Yuan

>Subject: RE: child maltreatment and economic hard times

>

>

>Hi everyone -

>

>I have a couple of related questions to Tom Hanna's posting. Our CAPTA

>Title II state prevention grantee from Colorado is working on a project

>examining increases in violence (child maltreatment, sexual assault,

>suicide and unintentional injury) during hard economic times -- quite

>timely right now.

>

>We know there's data and research showing the linkages between poverty

>and child maltreatment (and being at-risk). The National Incidence

>Study-3 findings demonstrate that family income was significantly

>related to incidence rates in nearly every category of maltreatment.

>Compared to children whose families earned $30,000 per year or more,

>those in families with annual incomes below $15,000 per year were more

>than 22 times more likely to experience some form of maltreatment under

>the Harm Standard (and over 25 times more likely to suffer maltreatment

>of some type using the Endangerment Standard). This is consistent with

>the findings of many different studies that children do not fare well

>in poorer families compared to nonpoor families. For more information on

NIS-3 visit:

>

>http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/statsinfo/nis3.cfm#family (and NIS-4

>should be coming out soon to update this information)

>

>I also emailed Ying-Ying Yuan who manages the technical assistance

>contract for our National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS).

>She reminded me that in Beyond Common Sense, they showed that in poorer

>counties, there were higher rates of maltreatment. She added that since

>CPS decisions about maltreatment are related to reporting, it is highly

>likely that increases in maltreatment will be found due to poverty IF

reporting increases. In periods

>of economic stress, reporting may increase or it may decrease.

>

>So-- the questions I wanted to pose to the listserve are:

>

>*

>

> Are you aware of any resources/research linking economic hard times

>and increases in child maltreatment? Are there studies that show any

>shifts/ trends in the incidence/ prevalence over time?

>*

>

> Do you have thoughts about whether there might be a decrease in the

>reporting rates and/or child victimization rates because families being

>diverted to other services or because of differential response systems

>for CPS that have developed in many places across the country? Are

>there studies that have examined this?

>

>Thanks for your help with this.

>

>Melissa

>

>Melissa Lim Brodowski, MSW, MPH

>Office on Child Abuse and Neglect

>Children's Bureau, ACYF, ACF, HHS

>1250 Maryland Avenue SW

>Portals Building, 8th Floor #8127

>Washington, DC 20024

>phone: 202-205-2629

>fax: 202-260-9345

>email: melissa.brodowskiacf.hhs.gov

>

>

>

> _____

>

>From: bounce-3361204-6833993list.cornell.edu on behalf of Tom Hanna

>Sent: Thu 12/4/2008 7:08 PM

>To: child-maltreatment-research-lcornell.edu

>Subject: What do Today's Neglect Cases Look Like?

>

>

>

>Dear Colleagues:

>

>I have some anecdotal reports that child neglect has recently become a

>bigger issue in some populations, and that the nature of the new

>neglect patterns may relate to "modern" stressors. Nothing specific,

>but I am wondering -- what neglect issues are you seeing or hearing

>about now, and are they any different than what you saw 5 years ago?

>

>Are there any key papers I should be consulting? Especially on shifts

>in incidence patterns, or in proven prevention strategies in direct

>service and/or in public awareness campaigns?

>

>I am hoping to apply what I learn to public awareness campaigns in the

>next few months -- and maybe this will be of use to all of us in

>developing research strategies on both the intervention and prevention

>sides of the neglect picture.

>

>Any input appreciated.

>

>--Thanks

>--Tom

>

>--

>--

>Tom Hanna, Director

>Child Abuse Prevention Network

>www.child-abuse.com

>tomchild-abuse.com

>tph3cornell.edu

>off 607.275.9360

>cel 607.227.4524

>fax: 415.962.0510

>--

>

>

>

>

>________________

>TNEF20185.rtf (28k bytes)