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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 7947
Date: 2008-12-09

Author:Robin

Subject:Re: New Lancet Report on Incidence of Child Maltreatment

Don't have the citation handy but a study was done here at CHOP several years ago, authers Cindy Christian, David Rubin, et al, that found that ED doctors disproportionately report/ suspect abuse in families of color, when compared with the actual origin of injury and eventual case findings. Robin Mekonnen, MSW, Phd Candidate Project Director The Children's Stability and Well Being Study at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia 3535 Market St. Suite 1545 Philadelphia, PA 19104 Phone: 267.426.2887 Email: mekonnen@email.chop.edu Fax: 215.590.0426 -----Original Message----- From: Alice Koenig To: 'Child Maltreatment Researchers' Sent: Tue, 9 Dec 2008 12:24 pm Subject: RE: New Lancet Report on Incidence of Child Maltreatment Sheri- Your last sentence is priceless and while on a serious level is not funny 0 after 35 + years in the field (child protective services) I am laughing in appreciation – you definitely hit one of the many nails on the head! Alice F. Koenig Hanover County Department of Social Services Virginia ________________________________ From: bounce-3372975-8508769@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-3372975-8508769@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of D F MCMAHON Sent: Monday, December 08, 2008 10:56 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: New Lancet Report on Incidence of Child Maltreatment I believe it is a generally well-established legal principle that children are not to be found legally deprived when the primary issue is financial, and in my state that principle is also established by statute. However, it is easy to narrow the definition and disconnect issues families face from a purely financial interpretation. "Reasonable efforts" seems to be used as a throwaway line--again, referring only to legal proceedings, which are at least technically separate from investigations and/or substantiation of abuse or neglect. There is the study from the 1980's that examined children receiving ER services in Massachusetts (Boston?) and linked CA/N reporting to the use of MA as a payment means. There was a bit of a twist, in that if the presenting issue was a chronic illness, more affluent families were more likely to be reported, apparently based on assumptions that poor people had less resources to address chronic illness while affluent parents did not have=2 0that "excuse." Although I am not a professional statistician and also do not have the data access many of the list participants have, I do have some statistical background (very abstract levels though) and have tried out simple correlation hypotheses using public data. On the macro level, correlations are elusive; realizing the degree to which states and local jurisdictions use their own definitions and standards (with sometimes startling inconsistencies) makes me wonder how useful "macro" analyses are even likely to be. It does seem to me that a child is most likely to enter foster care if one lives in a state settled by white Scandinavians within the last 130 years (particularly, of course, if one is Native American). Sheri McMahon ________________________________ From: murray.straus@unh.edu To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Subject: RE: New Lancet Report on Incidence of Child Maltreatment Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2008 21:20:55 -0500 Although differences in resources available to higher socioeconomic (SES) parents, and also stereotypes by professionals about the behavior of parents of different SES levels, are part of the explanation of the higher rate child maltreatment by low SES parents, in my opinion they are only a part of explanation. Other parts of the explanation include more children and fewer resources, greater occurrence of many other life stresses, lower education and less understanding of normal child development, more use of corporal punishment etc. The National Family Violence Surveys in 1975, 1985, and 1995 other studies used anonymous interviews with parents to measure child physical and psychological abuse on the basis of the behavior of parents as reported by parents. These studies have found that the lower the SES, the higher the rate of child maltreatment. See for example: Straus, M. A., Gelles, R. J., & Steinmetz, S. K. (1980 (2006)). Behind closed doors: Violence in the American family New York: Doubleday/Anchor Books (Re-issued Transaction Publications, 2006 with a new forward by Richard J. Gelles and Murray A. Straus). Wauchope, B. A., & Straus, M. A. (1990). Physical punishment and physical abuse of American children: Incidence rates by age, gender, and occupational class. In M. A. Straus & R. J. Gelles (Eds.), Physical violence in American families: Risk factors and adaptations to violence in 8,145 families (pp. 133-148). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Books. Murray A. Straus Professor of Sociology and Co-Director Family Research Laboratory University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 603-862-2594 Fax: 603-862-1122 murray.straus@unh.edu Copies of many of my papers and some out-of-print books can be downloaded from my website http://pubpages.unh.edu/~mas2. For information about the Family Research Laboratory, conferences, and bibliographies of publications by members of the20laboratory log into www.unh.edu/frl. From: bounce-3368048-6832504@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-3368048-6832504@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Many, Michele Sent: 2008-12-07 17:58 To: Child Maltreatment Researchers; Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: New Lancet Report on Incidence of Child Maltreatment Here, here. Also, how much is the association between child maltreatment and poverty impacted by the additional insulation from child protective services via passive (or active) intimidation of babysitters, nannies, teachers, doctors, etc., and the ability for higher SES clients to control access to collateral sources of information prior to any chance of reporting? Michele M. Many, MSW, LCSW, BACS Assistant Professor LSU Department of Psychiatry -----Original Message----- From: bounce-3367701-9198871@list.cornell.edu on behalf of Taylor, Peggy Sent: Sun 12/7/2008 1:47 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: New Lancet Report on Incidence of C hild Maltreatment This study raises interesting questions about the prevailing assumption that the demonstrated relationship between child maltreatment and poverty is evidence that low income parents are more likely to be 'poor' parents and mistreat their children. I would love to see or conduct a study that looks at the differences in outcomes of child protective service investigations and child welfare initial hearings for parents with sufficient resources to have a private attorney and health insurance to cover family services with outcomes in investigations and hearings where parents have none of these resources. How often are identified mistreated children not served by child welfare agencies because their parents' private attorney proposes a safetly plan that includes family therapy with a therapist of the parents' choice? Is it possible that the 'demonstrated' associated between poverty and child maltreatment is more of a measure of families' wherewithall to pay for legal and mental health services themselves than it is a measure of the safety of children in families with higher incomes and better insurance? Peggy Taylor, LMSW Lawrence, Kansas _____ From: bounce-3366075-6834006@list.cornell.edu on behalf of F.Schultz@SBCSocialServ.org Sent: Fri 12/5/2008 8:01 PM To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Subject: New Lancet Report on Incidence of Child Maltreatment I thought that many might be interested in this new report. Child Abuse Much More Common Than Official Statistics Indicate Caroline Cassels Medscape Medical News 2008. (c) 2008 Medscape http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/584817_print December 5, 2008 - Child abuse in high-income countries is far more common than official statistics show, with just 10% of suspected cases investigated and substantiated annually, new research suggests. Published online December 4 in the Lancet, the study, led by Ruth Gilbert, MD, from University College London Institute of Child Health, United Kingdom, is 1 of a series of 4 papers in this issue of the Lancet that highlight the issue of childhood maltreatment. According to the study, 4% to 16% of children are physically abused and 1 in 10 is neglected or psychologically abused every year. In addition, between 5% and 10% of girls and up to 5% of boys are exposed to penetrative sexual abuse, and up to 3 times this number are exposed to any type of sexual abuse. However, the investigators note that official rates for substantiated child maltreatment indicate less than a tenth of this burden. The impact of child maltreatment can have devastating and long-lasting consequences that persist in to adulthood. For instance, the authors note that maltreated children are at increased risk for criminal behavior, are more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior, and are at significantly higher risk for drug and alcohol abuse. "The most tragic manifestation of the burden of child maltreatment is the thousands of child deaths every year due to murder or neglect," the authors write. According to the World Health Organization, worldwide, 155,000 children younger than 15 years die annually as a result of abuse or neglect. Biological parents are responsible for 80% of cases and stepparents for 15%. In the United Kingdom, 35% of child murder victims are younger than 1 year. It is estimated that in the European Union, 4 in every 1 million children die from homicide or manslaughter every year. In central and eastern Europe and the Newly Independent States, the rate is 3 times greater, the authors report. Abuse Significantly Underreported A second study, also conducted by Dr. Gilbert and colleagues, shows that in most settings child abuse is significantly underreported - even by schools and community-health services that have continuous contact with children. However, this phenomenon also extends to professionals in primary care, mental health, and law enforcement. Reasons for underreporting, say the authors, include lack of awareness about the signs of maltreatment and the processes for reporting to child-protection agencies, a nd the perception that reporting might do more harm than good. However, even when maltreatment is suspected, the authors note, professionals often do not report the case unless they have a high level of certainty that maltreatment has occurred. To illustrate the extent of uncertainty about maltreatment, the researchers highlight a prospective study from the United States that showed that doctors suspected about 10% of 15,000 child-injury visits were due to maltreatment. However, only 6% of cases were reported (Pediatrics 2008;122:611-619). "Professionals who have continuous contact with children, such as people working in schools and community health services, can have a leading role in recognizing, responding to, and supporting maltreated children. Their scarce reporting to child-protection agencies is a cause for concern, and we need to find out whether maltreatment is being recognized and dealt with in other ways. Doubts are widespread that the benefits of reporting suspected case of maltreatment to child-protection services outweigh the harms," the authors conclude. In an accompanying editorial, Richard Horton, MB, editor of the Lancet, and senior editor Richard Turner, MD, express hope that this series of articles will raise awareness about child abuse and will help guide clinicians and other professionals who come in contact with children who might be abuse victims. "It is to clinicians and other professionals responsible for caring for children20that the Lancet's Child Maltreatment Series is aimed, with the intention of providing them with a rigorous and up-to-date summary of scientific evidence and conceptual work on this complex and demanding topic," they write. The researchers have disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Lancet. Published online December 4, 2008. Freya Schultz, Staff Analyst Santa Barbara County Social Services, Child Welfare Services 234 Camino del Remedio Santa Barbara, CA 93110 (805) 696-8972 **Notice of Privacy** This information is private and confidential and intended solely for the person or persons addressed herein. If you have received this communication in error, immediately notify sender and destroy / delete any copies of this transmission. Thank you for your compliance. ________________________________ Listen to 350+ music, sports, & news radio stations – including songs for the holidays – FREE while you browse. Start Listening Now !

Don't have the citation handy but a study was done here at CHOP several years ago, authers Cindy Christian, David Rubin, et al, that found that ED doctors disproportionately report/ suspect abuse in families of color, when compared with the actual origin of injury and eventual case findings. Robin Mekonnen, MSW, Phd Candidate Project Director The Children's Stability and Well Being Study at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia 3535 Market St. Suite 1545 Philadelphia, PA 19104 Phone: 267.426.2887 Email: mekonnenemail.chop.edu Fax: 215.590.0426 -----Original Message----- From: Alice Koenig To: 'Child Maltreatment Researchers' Sent: Tue, 9 Dec 2008 12:24 pm Subject: RE: New Lancet Report on Incidence of Child Maltreatment Sheri- Your last sentence is priceless and while on a serious level is not funny 0 after 35 + years in the field (child protective services) I am laughing in appreciation – you definitely hit one of the many nails on the head! Alice F. Koenig Hanover County Department of Social Services Virginia ________________________________ From: bounce-3372975-8508769list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-3372975-8508769list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of D F MCMAHON Sent: Monday, December 08, 2008 10:56 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: New Lancet Report on Incidence of Child Maltreatment I believe it is a generally well-established legal principle that children are not to be found legally deprived when the primary issue is financial, and in my state that principle is also established by statute. However, it is easy to narrow the definition and disconnect issues families face from a purely financial interpretation. "Reasonable efforts" seems to be used as a throwaway line--again, referring only to legal proceedings, which are at least technically separate from investigations and/or substantiation of abuse or neglect. There is the study from the 1980's that examined children receiving ER services in Massachusetts (Boston?) and linked CA/N reporting to the use of MA as a payment means. There was a bit of a twist, in that if the presenting issue was a chronic illness, more affluent families were more likely to be reported, apparently based on assumptions that poor people had less resources to address chronic illness while affluent parents did not have=2 0that "excuse." Although I am not a professional statistician and also do not have the data access many of the list participants have, I do have some statistical background (very abstract levels though) and have tried out simple correlation hypotheses using public data. On the macro level, correlations are elusive; realizing the degree to which states and local jurisdictions use their own definitions and standards (with sometimes startling inconsistencies) makes me wonder how useful "macro" analyses are even likely to be. It does seem to me that a child is most likely to enter foster care if one lives in a state settled by white Scandinavians within the last 130 years (particularly, of course, if one is Native American). Sheri McMahon ________________________________ From: murray.strausunh.edu To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Subject: RE: New Lancet Report on Incidence of Child Maltreatment Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2008 21:20:55 -0500 Although differences in resources available to higher socioeconomic (SES) parents, and also stereotypes by professionals about the behavior of parents of different SES levels, are part of the explanation of the higher rate child maltreatment by low SES parents, in my opinion they are only a part of explanation. Other parts of the explanation include more children and fewer resources, greater occurrence of many other life stresses, lower education and less understanding of normal child development, more use of corporal punishment etc. The National Family Violence Surveys in 1975, 1985, and 1995 other studies used anonymous interviews with parents to measure child physical and psychological abuse on the basis of the behavior of parents as reported by parents. These studies have found that the lower the SES, the higher the rate of child maltreatment. See for example: Straus, M. A., Gelles, R. J., & Steinmetz, S. K. (1980 (2006)). Behind closed doors: Violence in the American family New York: Doubleday/Anchor Books (Re-issued Transaction Publications, 2006 with a new forward by Richard J. Gelles and Murray A. Straus). Wauchope, B. A., & Straus, M. A. (1990). Physical punishment and physical abuse of American children: Incidence rates by age, gender, and occupational class. In M. A. Straus & R. J. Gelles (Eds.), Physical violence in American families: Risk factors and adaptations to violence in 8,145 families (pp. 133-148). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Books. Murray A. Straus Professor of Sociology and Co-Director Family Research Laboratory University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 603-862-2594 Fax: 603-862-1122 murray.strausunh.edu Copies of many of my papers and some out-of-print books can be downloaded from my website http://pubpages.unh.edu/~mas2. For information about the Family Research Laboratory, conferences, and bibliographies of publications by members of the20laboratory log into www.unh.edu/frl. From: bounce-3368048-6832504list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-3368048-6832504list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Many, Michele Sent: 2008-12-07 17:58 To: Child Maltreatment Researchers; Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: New Lancet Report on Incidence of Child Maltreatment Here, here. Also, how much is the association between child maltreatment and poverty impacted by the additional insulation from child protective services via passive (or active) intimidation of babysitters, nannies, teachers, doctors, etc., and the ability for higher SES clients to control access to collateral sources of information prior to any chance of reporting? Michele M. Many, MSW, LCSW, BACS Assistant Professor LSU Department of Psychiatry -----Original Message----- From: bounce-3367701-9198871list.cornell.edu on behalf of Taylor, Peggy Sent: Sun 12/7/2008 1:47 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: New Lancet Report on Incidence of C hild Maltreatment This study raises interesting questions about the prevailing assumption that the demonstrated relationship between child maltreatment and poverty is evidence that low income parents are more likely to be 'poor' parents and mistreat their children. I would love to see or conduct a study that looks at the differences in outcomes of child protective service investigations and child welfare initial hearings for parents with sufficient resources to have a private attorney and health insurance to cover family services with outcomes in investigations and hearings where parents have none of these resources. How often are identified mistreated children not served by child welfare agencies because their parents' private attorney proposes a safetly plan that includes family therapy with a therapist of the parents' choice? Is it possible that the 'demonstrated' associated between poverty and child maltreatment is more of a measure of families' wherewithall to pay for legal and mental health services themselves than it is a measure of the safety of children in families with higher incomes and better insurance? Peggy Taylor, LMSW Lawrence, Kansas _____ From: bounce-3366075-6834006list.cornell.edu on behalf of F.SchultzSBCSocialServ.org Sent: Fri 12/5/2008 8:01 PM To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Subject: New Lancet Report on Incidence of Child Maltreatment I thought that many might be interested in this new report. Child Abuse Much More Common Than Official Statistics Indicate Caroline Cassels Medscape Medical News 2008. (c) 2008 Medscape http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/584817_print December 5, 2008 - Child abuse in high-income countries is far more common than official statistics show, with just 10% of suspected cases investigated and substantiated annually, new research suggests. Published online December 4 in the Lancet, the study, led by Ruth Gilbert, MD, from University College London Institute of Child Health, United Kingdom, is 1 of a series of 4 papers in this issue of the Lancet that highlight the issue of childhood maltreatment. According to the study, 4% to 16% of children are physically abused and 1 in 10 is neglected or psychologically abused every year. In addition, between 5% and 10% of girls and up to 5% of boys are exposed to penetrative sexual abuse, and up to 3 times this number are exposed to any type of sexual abuse. However, the investigators note that official rates for substantiated child maltreatment indicate less than a tenth of this burden. The impact of child maltreatment can have devastating and long-lasting consequences that persist in to adulthood. For instance, the authors note that maltreated children are at increased risk for criminal behavior, are more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior, and are at significantly higher risk for drug and alcohol abuse. "The most tragic manifestation of the burden of child maltreatment is the thousands of child deaths every year due to murder or neglect," the authors write. According to the World Health Organization, worldwide, 155,000 children younger than 15 years die annually as a result of abuse or neglect. Biological parents are responsible for 80% of cases and stepparents for 15%. In the United Kingdom, 35% of child murder victims are younger than 1 year. It is estimated that in the European Union, 4 in every 1 million children die from homicide or manslaughter every year. In central and eastern Europe and the Newly Independent States, the rate is 3 times greater, the authors report. Abuse Significantly Underreported A second study, also conducted by Dr. Gilbert and colleagues, shows that in most settings child abuse is significantly underreported - even by schools and community-health services that have continuous contact with children. However, this phenomenon also extends to professionals in primary care, mental health, and law enforcement. Reasons for underreporting, say the authors, include lack of awareness about the signs of maltreatment and the processes for reporting to child-protection agencies, a nd the perception that reporting might do more harm than good. However, even when maltreatment is suspected, the authors note, professionals often do not report the case unless they have a high level of certainty that maltreatment has occurred. To illustrate the extent of uncertainty about maltreatment, the researchers highlight a prospective study from the United States that showed that doctors suspected about 10% of 15,000 child-injury visits were due to maltreatment. However, only 6% of cases were reported (Pediatrics 2008;122:611-619). "Professionals who have continuous contact with children, such as people working in schools and community health services, can have a leading role in recognizing, responding to, and supporting maltreated children. Their scarce reporting to child-protection agencies is a cause for concern, and we need to find out whether maltreatment is being recognized and dealt with in other ways. Doubts are widespread that the benefits of reporting suspected case of maltreatment to child-protection services outweigh the harms," the authors conclude. In an accompanying editorial, Richard Horton, MB, editor of the Lancet, and senior editor Richard Turner, MD, express hope that this series of articles will raise awareness about child abuse and will help guide clinicians and other professionals who come in contact with children who might be abuse victims. "It is to clinicians and other professionals responsible for caring for children20that the Lancet's Child Maltreatment Series is aimed, with the intention of providing them with a rigorous and up-to-date summary of scientific evidence and conceptual work on this complex and demanding topic," they write. The researchers have disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Lancet. Published online December 4, 2008. Freya Schultz, Staff Analyst Santa Barbara County Social Services, Child Welfare Services 234 Camino del Remedio Santa Barbara, CA 93110 (805) 696-8972 **Notice of Privacy** This information is private and confidential and intended solely for the person or persons addressed herein. If you have received this communication in error, immediately notify sender and destroy / delete any copies of this transmission. Thank you for your compliance. ________________________________ Listen to 350+ music, sports, & news radio stations – including songs for the holidays – FREE while you browse. Start Listening Now !