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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 7947
Date: 2008-12-09

Author:Sherrill Clark

Subject:RE: child maltreatment and economic hard times

In addition to family characteristics, we might also consider that in

economic hard times there are fewer resources available to families (staff

losses due to budget cuts, non profits that go out of business, change their

focus, close storefront community-based centers, or the cost of services to

families goes up and become unaffordable.for example) to prevent distress

that reaches the maltreatment level. This is a more policy-focused

perspective that doesn't target the families' deficits per se.



Sherrill Clark

CalSWEC



_____



From: bounce-3362146-7059115@list.cornell.edu

[mailto:bounce-3362146-7059115@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Brodowski,

Melissa (ACF)

Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2008 8:36 PM

To: Child Maltreatment Researchers

Cc: sbates@smtpgate.dphe.state.co.us; Ying-Ying Yuan

Subject: RE: child maltreatment and economic hard times





Hi everyone -



I have a couple of related questions to Tom Hanna's posting. Our CAPTA

Title II state prevention grantee from Colorado is working on a project

examining increases in violence (child maltreatment, sexual assault, suicide

and unintentional injury) during hard economic times -- quite timely right

now.



We know there's data and research showing the linkages between poverty and

child maltreatment (and being at-risk). The National Incidence Study-3

findings demonstrate that family income was significantly related to

incidence rates in nearly every category of maltreatment. Compared to

children whose families earned $30,000 per year or more, those in families

with annual incomes below $15,000 per year were more than 22 times more

likely to experience some form of maltreatment under the Harm Standard (and

over 25 times more likely to suffer maltreatment of some type using the

Endangerment Standard). This is consistent with the findings of many

different studies that children do not fare well in poorer families compared

to nonpoor families. For more information on NIS-3 visit:



http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/statsinfo/nis3.cfm#family (and NIS-4

should be coming out soon to update this information)



I also emailed Ying-Ying Yuan who manages the technical assistance contract

for our National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS). She reminded

me that in Beyond Common Sense, they showed that in poorer counties, there

were higher rates of maltreatment. She added that since CPS decisions about

maltreatment are related to reporting, it is highly likely that increases in

maltreatment will be found due to poverty IF reporting increases. In periods

of economic stress, reporting may increase or it may decrease.



So-- the questions I wanted to pose to the listserve are:



*



Are you aware of any resources/research linking economic hard times

and increases in child maltreatment? Are there studies that show any shifts/

trends in the incidence/ prevalence over time?

*



Do you have thoughts about whether there might be a decrease in the

reporting rates and/or child victimization rates because families being

diverted to other services or because of differential response systems for

CPS that have developed in many places across the country? Are there studies

that have examined this?



Thanks for your help with this.



Melissa



Melissa Lim Brodowski, MSW, MPH

Office on Child Abuse and Neglect

Children's Bureau, ACYF, ACF, HHS

1250 Maryland Avenue SW

Portals Building, 8th Floor #8127

Washington, DC 20024

phone: 202-205-2629

fax: 202-260-9345

email: melissa.brodowski@acf.hhs.gov







_____



From: bounce-3361204-6833993@list.cornell.edu on behalf of Tom Hanna

Sent: Thu 12/4/2008 7:08 PM

To: child-maltreatment-research-l@cornell.edu

Subject: What do Today's Neglect Cases Look Like?







Dear Colleagues:



I have some anecdotal reports that child neglect has recently become

a bigger issue in some populations, and that the nature of the new

neglect patterns may relate to "modern" stressors. Nothing specific,

but I am wondering -- what neglect issues are you seeing or hearing

about now, and are they any different than what you saw 5 years ago?



Are there any key papers I should be consulting? Especially on shifts

in incidence patterns, or in proven prevention strategies in direct

service and/or in public awareness campaigns?



I am hoping to apply what I learn to public awareness campaigns in

the next few months -- and maybe this will be of use to all of us in

developing research strategies on both the intervention and

prevention sides of the neglect picture.



Any input appreciated.



--Thanks

--Tom



--

--

Tom Hanna, Director

Child Abuse Prevention Network

www.child-abuse.com

tom@child-abuse.com

tph3@cornell.edu

off 607.275.9360

cel 607.227.4524

fax: 415.962.0510

--















In addition to family characteristics, we might also consider that in

economic hard times there are fewer resources available to families (staff

losses due to budget cuts, non profits that go out of business, change their

focus, close storefront community-based centers, or the cost of services to

families goes up and become unaffordable.for example) to prevent distress

that reaches the maltreatment level. This is a more policy-focused

perspective that doesn't target the families' deficits per se.



Sherrill Clark

CalSWEC



_____



From: bounce-3362146-7059115list.cornell.edu

[mailto:bounce-3362146-7059115list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Brodowski,

Melissa (ACF)

Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2008 8:36 PM

To: Child Maltreatment Researchers

Cc: sbatessmtpgate.dphe.state.co.us; Ying-Ying Yuan

Subject: RE: child maltreatment and economic hard times





Hi everyone -



I have a couple of related questions to Tom Hanna's posting. Our CAPTA

Title II state prevention grantee from Colorado is working on a project

examining increases in violence (child maltreatment, sexual assault, suicide

and unintentional injury) during hard economic times -- quite timely right

now.



We know there's data and research showing the linkages between poverty and

child maltreatment (and being at-risk). The National Incidence Study-3

findings demonstrate that family income was significantly related to

incidence rates in nearly every category of maltreatment. Compared to

children whose families earned $30,000 per year or more, those in families

with annual incomes below $15,000 per year were more than 22 times more

likely to experience some form of maltreatment under the Harm Standard (and

over 25 times more likely to suffer maltreatment of some type using the

Endangerment Standard). This is consistent with the findings of many

different studies that children do not fare well in poorer families compared

to nonpoor families. For more information on NIS-3 visit:



http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/statsinfo/nis3.cfm#family (and NIS-4

should be coming out soon to update this information)



I also emailed Ying-Ying Yuan who manages the technical assistance contract

for our National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS). She reminded

me that in Beyond Common Sense, they showed that in poorer counties, there

were higher rates of maltreatment. She added that since CPS decisions about

maltreatment are related to reporting, it is highly likely that increases in

maltreatment will be found due to poverty IF reporting increases. In periods

of economic stress, reporting may increase or it may decrease.



So-- the questions I wanted to pose to the listserve are:



*



Are you aware of any resources/research linking economic hard times

and increases in child maltreatment? Are there studies that show any shifts/

trends in the incidence/ prevalence over time?

*



Do you have thoughts about whether there might be a decrease in the

reporting rates and/or child victimization rates because families being

diverted to other services or because of differential response systems for

CPS that have developed in many places across the country? Are there studies

that have examined this?



Thanks for your help with this.



Melissa



Melissa Lim Brodowski, MSW, MPH

Office on Child Abuse and Neglect

Children's Bureau, ACYF, ACF, HHS

1250 Maryland Avenue SW

Portals Building, 8th Floor #8127

Washington, DC 20024

phone: 202-205-2629

fax: 202-260-9345

email: melissa.brodowskiacf.hhs.gov







_____



From: bounce-3361204-6833993list.cornell.edu on behalf of Tom Hanna

Sent: Thu 12/4/2008 7:08 PM

To: child-maltreatment-research-lcornell.edu

Subject: What do Today's Neglect Cases Look Like?







Dear Colleagues:



I have some anecdotal reports that child neglect has recently become

a bigger issue in some populations, and that the nature of the new

neglect patterns may relate to "modern" stressors. Nothing specific,

but I am wondering -- what neglect issues are you seeing or hearing

about now, and are they any different than what you saw 5 years ago?



Are there any key papers I should be consulting? Especially on shifts

in incidence patterns, or in proven prevention strategies in direct

service and/or in public awareness campaigns?



I am hoping to apply what I learn to public awareness campaigns in

the next few months -- and maybe this will be of use to all of us in

developing research strategies on both the intervention and

prevention sides of the neglect picture.



Any input appreciated.



--Thanks

--Tom



--

--

Tom Hanna, Director

Child Abuse Prevention Network

www.child-abuse.com

tomchild-abuse.com

tph3cornell.edu

off 607.275.9360

cel 607.227.4524

fax: 415.962.0510

--