Skip to main content



Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 10263
Date: 2017-10-18

Author:Katie Steck

Subject:Re: perceptions of child maltreatment

Here is one that covers perceptions about what constitutes abuse; I’m not certain it gets to what you are looking for, but it might have some good citations to look at that will get you closer to what you are looking for. Bensley, L., Ruggles, D., Simmons, K. W., Harris, C., Williams, K., Putvin, T., & Allen, M. (2004). General population norms about child abuse and neglect and associations with childhood experiences. Child Abuse and Neglect, 28(12), 1321–1337. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2004.07.004 And here’s the abstract to make your life more convenient: A variety of definitions of child abuse and neglect exist. However, little is known about norms in the general population as to what constitutes child abuse and neglect or how perceived norms may be related to personal experiences. We conducted a random-digit-dialed telephone survey of 504 Washington State adults. Respondents were asked whether they believed each of 34 behaviors, identified in focus groups as possibly physically, sexually or emotionally abusive or neglectful, constituted abuse or neglect. Then, they were asked whether they had experienced 33 of the behaviors. Five of the six behaviors with the highest levels of consensus were for sexual abuse, whereas only one emotionally abusive behavior had a high level of consensus (95% agreement). Consensus that spanking constituted abuse increased with severity. Those respondents who reported experiencing a particular behavior were significantly less likely to believe the behavior abusive for 11 of the 33 behaviors and more likely to believe the behavior abusive for two of the behaviors. Where comparisons were possible, there was a high level of consensus that behaviors identified as abusive in Child Protective Service operational definitions constituted abuse. Self-reported childhood experiences were associated with perceived norms about child abuse. A better understanding of community norms about child abuse and neglect may be helpful in communicating with the public or allow for better targeting of educational messages through the media, parenting education classes, and so forth. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Katie Steck Education Coordinator |The Younique Foundation o. 385.345.4556|m. 801.243.4407 ksteck@youniquefoundation.org NOTICE: This E-mail and any of its attachments may contain proprietary information, which is privileged, confidential, or subject to copyright belonging to The Younique Foundation. This E-mail is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to which it is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient of this E-mail, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, copying, or action taken in relation to the contents of and attachments to this E-mail is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this E-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and permanently delete the original and any copy of this E-mail and any printout. From: on behalf of Joseph Ryan Reply-To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Date: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at 9:44 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Cc: "Child-Maltreatment-Research-L@cornell.edu" Subject: perceptions of child maltreatment I am looking for any national surveys that tap into the perceptions - and more specifically the prevalence - of child abuse and neglect. Basically - does the general population understand the scope of maltreatment in the united states? My guess is that most people underestimate, but would like some evidence. Any leads or suggestions would be appreciated. Best, Joe -- Joseph P. Ryan, Ph.D. Associate Professor University of Michigan ssw-datalab.org

Here is one that covers perceptions about what constitutes abuse; I’m not certain it gets to what you are looking for, but it might have some good citations to look at that will get you closer to what you are looking for. Bensley, L., Ruggles, D., Simmons, K. W., Harris, C., Williams, K., Putvin, T., & Allen, M. (2004). General population norms about child abuse and neglect and associations with childhood experiences. Child Abuse and Neglect, 28(12), 1321–1337. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2004.07.004 And here’s the abstract to make your life more convenient: A variety of definitions of child abuse and neglect exist. However, little is known about norms in the general population as to what constitutes child abuse and neglect or how perceived norms may be related to personal experiences. We conducted a random-digit-dialed telephone survey of 504 Washington State adults. Respondents were asked whether they believed each of 34 behaviors, identified in focus groups as possibly physically, sexually or emotionally abusive or neglectful, constituted abuse or neglect. Then, they were asked whether they had experienced 33 of the behaviors. Five of the six behaviors with the highest levels of consensus were for sexual abuse, whereas only one emotionally abusive behavior had a high level of consensus (95% agreement). Consensus that spanking constituted abuse increased with severity. Those respondents who reported experiencing a particular behavior were significantly less likely to believe the behavior abusive for 11 of the 33 behaviors and more likely to believe the behavior abusive for two of the behaviors. Where comparisons were possible, there was a high level of consensus that behaviors identified as abusive in Child Protective Service operational definitions constituted abuse. Self-reported childhood experiences were associated with perceived norms about child abuse. A better understanding of community norms about child abuse and neglect may be helpful in communicating with the public or allow for better targeting of educational messages through the media, parenting education classes, and so forth. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Katie Steck Education Coordinator |The Younique Foundation o. 385.345.4556|m. 801.243.4407 ksteckyouniquefoundation.org NOTICE: This E-mail and any of its attachments may contain proprietary information, which is privileged, confidential, or subject to copyright belonging to The Younique Foundation. This E-mail is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to which it is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient of this E-mail, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, copying, or action taken in relation to the contents of and attachments to this E-mail is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this E-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and permanently delete the original and any copy of this E-mail and any printout. From: on behalf of Joseph Ryan Reply-To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Date: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at 9:44 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Cc: "Child-Maltreatment-Research-Lcornell.edu" Subject: perceptions of child maltreatment I am looking for any national surveys that tap into the perceptions - and more specifically the prevalence - of child abuse and neglect. Basically - does the general population understand the scope of maltreatment in the united states? My guess is that most people underestimate, but would like some evidence. Any leads or suggestions would be appreciated. Best, Joe -- Joseph P. Ryan, Ph.D. Associate Professor University of Michigan ssw-datalab.org