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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 29, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 10171
Date: 2017-06-02

Author:Arcus, Doreen

Subject:Re: Grandparents raising Younger Children

Hope this is helpful *Record: 1* Determining the success of grandparent education. Strom, Robert; Beckert, Troy; Strom, Shirley; Educational Gerontology, Vol 22(7), Oct-Nov, 1996 pp. 637-649. Publisher: Taylor & Francis; [Journal Article] Abstract: Evaluated the outcomes of a course for grandparents. A sample of 87 consanguineous Ss included 29 grandparents (aged 47–74 yrs), 29 grandchildren (aged 6–18 yrs), and 29 of the grandchildren's parents. 12 class sessions explored how the experiences of growing up and raising children differ from the recent past and attempted to identify corresponding changes required for the older relatives. Each generation was administered the Grandparent Strengths and Needs Inventory before and after grandparents attended the course. The participants reported perceptions regarding 6 dimensions of grandparent attitudes and behaviors. According to the grandparents, the course resulted in increased satisfaction, greater success, and more effective teaching in family relationships. They reported making gains for 58 out of 60 items. Parents and grandchildren corroborated most of these gains by higher posttest scores. The findings confirm that family development goals can be supported by making education for grandparents available and encouraging them to remain influential in their families through continued learning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 2* Emotional well-being among grandparents raising children affected and orphaned by HIV disease. Joslin, Daphne; In: Grandparents raising grandchildren: Theoretical, empirical, and clinical perspectives. Hayslip, Bert Jr. (Ed); Goldberg-Glen, Robin (Ed); Publisher: Springer Publishing Co; 2000, pp. 87-105. [Chapter] Abstract: This chapter discusses the prevalence of grandparents raising children orphaned and affected by parental HIV disease and death, the uniqueness of these circumstances, findings from recent descriptive research, and relevant research, program, and policy issues. It focuses the psychosocial needs and emotional well-being of caregivers. This chapter also reports an exploratory study that was conducted to gather information about the physical and emotional health of these grandparents raising HIV-affected grandchildren and to identify factors associated with poorer self-reported physical and psychological well-being. Ss were 20 caregivers (aged 47–75 yrs) who were raising children whose primary parent has died from or is living with the HIV disease. Results show that nearly one half of the Ss rated their emotional health as 'excellent' or 'good.' These findings underscore the emotional resiliency of older relatives who assume parental surrogacy under conditions of great emotional distress and pain. However, signs of emotional distress, such as depression, hopelessness, and anxiety, suggest a vulnerability masked by their determination to care for their grandchildren. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 3* Goals for grandparents and support groups. Strom, Robert D.; Strom, Shirley K.; In: Grandparents raising grandchildren: Theoretical, empirical, and clinical perspectives. Hayslip, Bert Jr. (Ed); Goldberg-Glen, Robin (Ed); Publisher: Springer Publishing Co; 2000, pp. 289-303. [Chapter] Abstract: Grandparents raising grandchildren know they are needed and should recognize that success depends on suitable goals and continued learning. Belonging to a support group can offer benefits when the emphasis is on linking optimistic attitudes and constructive behavior, when members are expected to progress through necessary growth stages, and when everyone gets practice in group process communication skills and acquires up-to-date lessons on raising children. This chapter discusses several topics including grandparent goals of being optimistic and adjusting to their caregiving role, learning contemporary views about children and adolescents, cooperating with the parent who shares responsibility for care, monitoring children's social and academic development, and arranging periodic relief from daily responsibilities. In addition, support group goals are reviewed including encouraging optimistic attitudes and constructive behaviors, establishing growth expectations for all members, acquiring and practicing group process skills, and assessing and learning needs and evaluating growth. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 4* Grandparents raising children with and without a developmental disability: Preliminary comparisons. Force, Lawrence T.; Botsford, Anne; Pisano, Peggy A.; Holbert, Amy; Journal of Gerontological Social Work, Vol 33(4), 2000 pp. 5-21. Publisher: Haworth Press; [Journal Article] Abstract: Compared characteristics and needs of 31 grandparent carers (mean age 57 yrs) raising grandchildren who have a developmental disability (G/DD)and 99 grandparent carers (mean age 54 yrs) raising grandchildren without a disability. The authors examined general similarities and differences between the 2 groups, special needs or issues for G/DD, differences in service utilization and need, differences in the availability of resources and benefits for these families, and if welfare reform laws impacted their availability. Ss' data were collected by telephone interviews. The results are discussed in terms of being both confirmatory and exploratory. Results are confirmatory in that they reaffirm previous studies associating grandparent carers with wariness of outside inquiries, presence of depression, presentation of good health to ward off questions of fitness, low access to potentially useful services, and low levels of financial supports. Findings are exploratory in that G/DD, in particular, are found to be low users of services and to represent more intact and traditional grandparent carer families. Data also indicate that both groups are users of benefit programs and that they are beginning to experience reductions in those benefits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 5* Learning about leaders: Exploring and measuring leadership qualities in grandparents and other relatives raising children. Littlewood, Kerry A.; Strozier, Anne L.; Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, Vol 7(4), Nov, 2009 pp. 371-393. Publisher: Taylor & Francis; [Journal Article] Abstract: The purpose of this study is to describe leadership qualities of grandparents and other relatives raising children and to determine if the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) is appropriate for assessing leadership for grandparents and other relatives raising children. This study reports the results of the LPI and a factor analysis to describe leadership qualities and test psychometric properties of the LPI. Subjects are 60 kinship caregivers attending advocacy trips to a state legislature to speak to policymakers about their issues. Results indicate that grandparents and other relatives view themselves as leaders. The principal axis factor analysis with varimax rotation extracted a five factor solution. The solution has good internal consistency and split-half reliability is robust. It appears that the LPI is a promising measure for use with kinship caregivers. More interventions are needed to foster the important quality of leadership among kinship caregivers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 6* Parental stress in grandparents versus parents raising children with behavior problems. Harrison, Kelley A.; Richman, Gina S.; Vittimberga, Glenda L.; Journal of Family Issues, Vol 21(2), Mar, 2000 pp. 262-270. Publisher: Sage Publications; [Journal Article] Abstract: Primary caregivers of 82 children exhibiting behavior problems were categorized into 3 family types: grandparent, single-parent, or 2-parent. Each caregiver completed the Parenting Stress Index and the Child Behavior Checklist. Results revealed that although all caregivers reported significant levels of behavior problems in their children, parents from both single- and 2-parent families reported higher levels of parental stress relative to grandparents. Discussion focuses on the need to identify the specific types of stressors affecting families of different constellations to develop appropriate treatment programs for clinic-referred children and their families. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 7* Service use and unmet service needs in grandparents raising grandchildren. Yancura, Loriena A.; Journal of Gerontological Social Work, Vol 56(6), Aug, 2013 pp. 473-486. Publisher: Taylor & Francis; [Journal Article] Abstract: Most in-depth studies of grandparents raising grandchildren use samples recruited from service providers, so little is known about those who do not use formal services. A sample of 200 grandparents registered with a public school district completed a survey on service use and unmet service needs. Of the 131 who did not use services, 82 reported unmet service needs, and 49 reported no needs. Those with unmet needs were younger, more likely to be Native Hawaiian, and less likely to receive public assistance. These findings indicate that some grandparents are falling through the cracks of the service provision network. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 8* Substance abuse exposure among youth being raised by grandparents in rural communities: Findings from a three-year evaluation. Crittenden, Jennifer; Adle, Melissa; Kaye, Lenard W.; Kates, Barbara; Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, Vol 7(2-3), Apr, 2009 pp. 291-305. Publisher: Taylor & Francis; [Journal Article] Abstract: This research describes the experiences of grandparents and other relatives living in rural Maine raising children affected by substance abuse. Stories and practice strategies are presented in the context of program evaluation findings from a three-year data collection effort consisting of survey protocols administered to caregivers and professionals receiving project services and semistructured interviews conducted with relative caregivers. Caregivers who participated in the research effort are satisfied with the services they receive when they are delivered in a manner that is respectful of their individual needs and rural traditions and when services extend beyond information and referral. Results of the evaluation contribute to the tenets of the promising practice of low-barrier service provision and the positive effect that support, both tangible and emotional, has on the well-being of rural kinship families. The use of innovative technologies and approaches in service provision not only increases awareness of resources among caregivers and professionals but also leads to the application of such knowledge to both more effective and seamless access to services and minimization of service utilization barriers for rural families. Results also underscore that research, when configured in a way that is flexible and meaningful, creates a valuable opportunity to gain insight from a traditionally difficult to reach population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) Doreen Arcus, Ph.D. Associate Professor Department of Psychology University of Massachusetts Lowell 113 Wilder St., Suite 300 Lowell, MA 01854-3059 Office: HSSB 313, Tel. 978-934-4172 Like our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DevelopmentalStudies/ CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail transmission, including any attachments, may contain information that is confidential, privileged, and/or sensitive in nature. It is solely for use by the individual or entity for whom it is intended, even if addressed incorrectly. If you have received this e-mail in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply email and delete this email from your files. Thank you for complying. On Jun 2, 2017, at 10:52 AM, Robert Longo wrote: I am working at a residential program that is considering involving more grandparents raising these children ages 0-16. Are there any articles or published studies on this topic? Rob Robert E. Longo, MRC, LPC, NCC Board Certified in Neurofeedback Serendipity Healing Arts Lexington, NC ISNR Board of Directors Web Site: www.roblongo.com E-mail: RobertLongoLPC@gmail.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE ~ HIPAA Privacy Notification: This message and accompanying documents are covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521, and contain information intended for the specified individual(s) only. The privacy of information sent via email cannot be guaranteed. I encourage you to consider this fact before communicating anything to me that you would prefer to keep confidential. If you are not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this document in error and that any review, dissemination, copying, or the taking of any action based on the contents of this information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by e-mail, and delete the original message. ________________________________ This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. www.avast.com

Hope this is helpful *Record: 1* Determining the success of grandparent education. Strom, Robert; Beckert, Troy; Strom, Shirley; Educational Gerontology, Vol 22(7), Oct-Nov, 1996 pp. 637-649. Publisher: Taylor & Francis; [Journal Article] Abstract: Evaluated the outcomes of a course for grandparents. A sample of 87 consanguineous Ss included 29 grandparents (aged 47–74 yrs), 29 grandchildren (aged 6–18 yrs), and 29 of the grandchildren's parents. 12 class sessions explored how the experiences of growing up and raising children differ from the recent past and attempted to identify corresponding changes required for the older relatives. Each generation was administered the Grandparent Strengths and Needs Inventory before and after grandparents attended the course. The participants reported perceptions regarding 6 dimensions of grandparent attitudes and behaviors. According to the grandparents, the course resulted in increased satisfaction, greater success, and more effective teaching in family relationships. They reported making gains for 58 out of 60 items. Parents and grandchildren corroborated most of these gains by higher posttest scores. The findings confirm that family development goals can be supported by making education for grandparents available and encouraging them to remain influential in their families through continued learning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 2* Emotional well-being among grandparents raising children affected and orphaned by HIV disease. Joslin, Daphne; In: Grandparents raising grandchildren: Theoretical, empirical, and clinical perspectives. Hayslip, Bert Jr. (Ed); Goldberg-Glen, Robin (Ed); Publisher: Springer Publishing Co; 2000, pp. 87-105. [Chapter] Abstract: This chapter discusses the prevalence of grandparents raising children orphaned and affected by parental HIV disease and death, the uniqueness of these circumstances, findings from recent descriptive research, and relevant research, program, and policy issues. It focuses the psychosocial needs and emotional well-being of caregivers. This chapter also reports an exploratory study that was conducted to gather information about the physical and emotional health of these grandparents raising HIV-affected grandchildren and to identify factors associated with poorer self-reported physical and psychological well-being. Ss were 20 caregivers (aged 47–75 yrs) who were raising children whose primary parent has died from or is living with the HIV disease. Results show that nearly one half of the Ss rated their emotional health as 'excellent' or 'good.' These findings underscore the emotional resiliency of older relatives who assume parental surrogacy under conditions of great emotional distress and pain. However, signs of emotional distress, such as depression, hopelessness, and anxiety, suggest a vulnerability masked by their determination to care for their grandchildren. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 3* Goals for grandparents and support groups. Strom, Robert D.; Strom, Shirley K.; In: Grandparents raising grandchildren: Theoretical, empirical, and clinical perspectives. Hayslip, Bert Jr. (Ed); Goldberg-Glen, Robin (Ed); Publisher: Springer Publishing Co; 2000, pp. 289-303. [Chapter] Abstract: Grandparents raising grandchildren know they are needed and should recognize that success depends on suitable goals and continued learning. Belonging to a support group can offer benefits when the emphasis is on linking optimistic attitudes and constructive behavior, when members are expected to progress through necessary growth stages, and when everyone gets practice in group process communication skills and acquires up-to-date lessons on raising children. This chapter discusses several topics including grandparent goals of being optimistic and adjusting to their caregiving role, learning contemporary views about children and adolescents, cooperating with the parent who shares responsibility for care, monitoring children's social and academic development, and arranging periodic relief from daily responsibilities. In addition, support group goals are reviewed including encouraging optimistic attitudes and constructive behaviors, establishing growth expectations for all members, acquiring and practicing group process skills, and assessing and learning needs and evaluating growth. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 4* Grandparents raising children with and without a developmental disability: Preliminary comparisons. Force, Lawrence T.; Botsford, Anne; Pisano, Peggy A.; Holbert, Amy; Journal of Gerontological Social Work, Vol 33(4), 2000 pp. 5-21. Publisher: Haworth Press; [Journal Article] Abstract: Compared characteristics and needs of 31 grandparent carers (mean age 57 yrs) raising grandchildren who have a developmental disability (G/DD)and 99 grandparent carers (mean age 54 yrs) raising grandchildren without a disability. The authors examined general similarities and differences between the 2 groups, special needs or issues for G/DD, differences in service utilization and need, differences in the availability of resources and benefits for these families, and if welfare reform laws impacted their availability. Ss' data were collected by telephone interviews. The results are discussed in terms of being both confirmatory and exploratory. Results are confirmatory in that they reaffirm previous studies associating grandparent carers with wariness of outside inquiries, presence of depression, presentation of good health to ward off questions of fitness, low access to potentially useful services, and low levels of financial supports. Findings are exploratory in that G/DD, in particular, are found to be low users of services and to represent more intact and traditional grandparent carer families. Data also indicate that both groups are users of benefit programs and that they are beginning to experience reductions in those benefits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 5* Learning about leaders: Exploring and measuring leadership qualities in grandparents and other relatives raising children. Littlewood, Kerry A.; Strozier, Anne L.; Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, Vol 7(4), Nov, 2009 pp. 371-393. Publisher: Taylor & Francis; [Journal Article] Abstract: The purpose of this study is to describe leadership qualities of grandparents and other relatives raising children and to determine if the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) is appropriate for assessing leadership for grandparents and other relatives raising children. This study reports the results of the LPI and a factor analysis to describe leadership qualities and test psychometric properties of the LPI. Subjects are 60 kinship caregivers attending advocacy trips to a state legislature to speak to policymakers about their issues. Results indicate that grandparents and other relatives view themselves as leaders. The principal axis factor analysis with varimax rotation extracted a five factor solution. The solution has good internal consistency and split-half reliability is robust. It appears that the LPI is a promising measure for use with kinship caregivers. More interventions are needed to foster the important quality of leadership among kinship caregivers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 6* Parental stress in grandparents versus parents raising children with behavior problems. Harrison, Kelley A.; Richman, Gina S.; Vittimberga, Glenda L.; Journal of Family Issues, Vol 21(2), Mar, 2000 pp. 262-270. Publisher: Sage Publications; [Journal Article] Abstract: Primary caregivers of 82 children exhibiting behavior problems were categorized into 3 family types: grandparent, single-parent, or 2-parent. Each caregiver completed the Parenting Stress Index and the Child Behavior Checklist. Results revealed that although all caregivers reported significant levels of behavior problems in their children, parents from both single- and 2-parent families reported higher levels of parental stress relative to grandparents. Discussion focuses on the need to identify the specific types of stressors affecting families of different constellations to develop appropriate treatment programs for clinic-referred children and their families. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 7* Service use and unmet service needs in grandparents raising grandchildren. Yancura, Loriena A.; Journal of Gerontological Social Work, Vol 56(6), Aug, 2013 pp. 473-486. Publisher: Taylor & Francis; [Journal Article] Abstract: Most in-depth studies of grandparents raising grandchildren use samples recruited from service providers, so little is known about those who do not use formal services. A sample of 200 grandparents registered with a public school district completed a survey on service use and unmet service needs. Of the 131 who did not use services, 82 reported unmet service needs, and 49 reported no needs. Those with unmet needs were younger, more likely to be Native Hawaiian, and less likely to receive public assistance. These findings indicate that some grandparents are falling through the cracks of the service provision network. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) *Database: * PsycINFO ------------------------------------------------------------------------ *Record: 8* Substance abuse exposure among youth being raised by grandparents in rural communities: Findings from a three-year evaluation. Crittenden, Jennifer; Adle, Melissa; Kaye, Lenard W.; Kates, Barbara; Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, Vol 7(2-3), Apr, 2009 pp. 291-305. Publisher: Taylor & Francis; [Journal Article] Abstract: This research describes the experiences of grandparents and other relatives living in rural Maine raising children affected by substance abuse. Stories and practice strategies are presented in the context of program evaluation findings from a three-year data collection effort consisting of survey protocols administered to caregivers and professionals receiving project services and semistructured interviews conducted with relative caregivers. Caregivers who participated in the research effort are satisfied with the services they receive when they are delivered in a manner that is respectful of their individual needs and rural traditions and when services extend beyond information and referral. Results of the evaluation contribute to the tenets of the promising practice of low-barrier service provision and the positive effect that support, both tangible and emotional, has on the well-being of rural kinship families. The use of innovative technologies and approaches in service provision not only increases awareness of resources among caregivers and professionals but also leads to the application of such knowledge to both more effective and seamless access to services and minimization of service utilization barriers for rural families. Results also underscore that research, when configured in a way that is flexible and meaningful, creates a valuable opportunity to gain insight from a traditionally difficult to reach population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) Doreen Arcus, Ph.D. Associate Professor Department of Psychology University of Massachusetts Lowell 113 Wilder St., Suite 300 Lowell, MA 01854-3059 Office: HSSB 313, Tel. 978-934-4172 Like our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DevelopmentalStudies/ CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail transmission, including any attachments, may contain information that is confidential, privileged, and/or sensitive in nature. It is solely for use by the individual or entity for whom it is intended, even if addressed incorrectly. If you have received this e-mail in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply email and delete this email from your files. Thank you for complying. On Jun 2, 2017, at 10:52 AM, Robert Longo wrote: I am working at a residential program that is considering involving more grandparents raising these children ages 0-16. Are there any articles or published studies on this topic? Rob Robert E. Longo, MRC, LPC, NCC Board Certified in Neurofeedback Serendipity Healing Arts Lexington, NC ISNR Board of Directors Web Site: www.roblongo.com E-mail: RobertLongoLPCgmail.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE ~ HIPAA Privacy Notification: This message and accompanying documents are covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521, and contain information intended for the specified individual(s) only. The privacy of information sent via email cannot be guaranteed. I encourage you to consider this fact before communicating anything to me that you would prefer to keep confidential. If you are not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this document in error and that any review, dissemination, copying, or the taking of any action based on the contents of this information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by e-mail, and delete the original message. ________________________________ This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. www.avast.com



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