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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 29, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 10166
Date: 2017-06-02

Author:John E. Hudson

Subject:RE: Grandparents raising Younger Children

I actually just saw this abstract this morning: Title: 2016 State of Grandfamilies: Raising Children of the Opioid Epidemic. Published: 2016 Available from: Generations United http://ipath.gu.org/ 1331 H Street NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20005 Printable version (PDF): http://www.grandfamilies.org/Portals/0/2016%20State%20of%20Grandfamilies%20Report%20FINAL.pdf Abstract: This testimony before the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs discusses the increase of opioid misuse and the impact on child welfare systems. It begins with a summary of the data that indicates between 2007 and 2014 the number of person who misuse prescription drugs, new users of heroin, and people with heroin dependence increased significantly and overdose deaths increased 286% between 2002 and 2013. Two aspects of parental opioid sue that affect the child welfare system are then discussed: prenatal opioid and other substance use exposure when it is determined that there are immediate safety factors resulting in the newborn being placed in protective custody; and post-natal use that affects parents’ ability to safely care for their children. The increasing percentage of children with parental alcohol or drug use as a factor in out-of-home placement from 29.4% in 2009 to 35.1% in 2014 is noted, as well as statements from child welfare agency professionals that report parental opioid use disorders are having a major impact on increasing child removals, preventing reunification, and increasing termination of parental rights. Efforts by Congress to address drug epidemics are reviewed, including Regional Partnership Grants and the Children Affected by Methamphetamine (CAM) Grant Program. The testimony closes with recommendations for implementing what has worked into system-wide reform. Strategies being implemented in Ohio to improve data collection, access to quality substance use disorder treatment, and improve collaborative practice are highlighted. 10 references. Maybe that will assist you. Yours, John E. Hudson, MSW Human Services Planner/Evaluator Social Work Division Buncombe County Health and Human Services (828) 250-5719 “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.”– HST From: bounce-121576129-69476758@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-121576129-69476758@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Robert Longo Sent: Friday, June 02, 2017 10:53 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Subject: Grandparents raising Younger Children I am working at a residential program that is considering involving more grandparents raising these children ages 0-16. Are there any articles or published studies on this topic? Rob Robert E. Longo, MRC, LPC, NCC Board Certified in Neurofeedback Serendipity Healing Arts Lexington, NC ISNR Board of Directors Web Site: www.roblongo.com E-mail: RobertLongoLPC@gmail.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE ~ HIPAA Privacy Notification: This message and accompanying documents are covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521, and contain information intended for the specified individual(s) only. The privacy of information sent via email cannot be guaranteed. I encourage you to consider this fact before communicating anything to me that you would prefer to keep confidential. If you are not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this document in error and that any review, dissemination, copying, or the taking of any action based on the contents of this information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by e-mail, and delete the original message. ________________________________ This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. www.avast.com Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties by an authorized State or County official. Unauthorized disclosure of juvenile, health, legally privileged, or otherwise confidential information, including confidential information relating to an ongoing State or County procurement effort, is prohibited by law. If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and delete all records of this e-mail.

I actually just saw this abstract this morning: Title: 2016 State of Grandfamilies: Raising Children of the Opioid Epidemic. Published: 2016 Available from: Generations United http://ipath.gu.org/ 1331 H Street NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20005 Printable version (PDF): http://www.grandfamilies.org/Portals/0/2016%20State%20of%20Grandfamilies%20Report%20FINAL.pdf Abstract: This testimony before the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs discusses the increase of opioid misuse and the impact on child welfare systems. It begins with a summary of the data that indicates between 2007 and 2014 the number of person who misuse prescription drugs, new users of heroin, and people with heroin dependence increased significantly and overdose deaths increased 286% between 2002 and 2013. Two aspects of parental opioid sue that affect the child welfare system are then discussed: prenatal opioid and other substance use exposure when it is determined that there are immediate safety factors resulting in the newborn being placed in protective custody; and post-natal use that affects parents’ ability to safely care for their children. The increasing percentage of children with parental alcohol or drug use as a factor in out-of-home placement from 29.4% in 2009 to 35.1% in 2014 is noted, as well as statements from child welfare agency professionals that report parental opioid use disorders are having a major impact on increasing child removals, preventing reunification, and increasing termination of parental rights. Efforts by Congress to address drug epidemics are reviewed, including Regional Partnership Grants and the Children Affected by Methamphetamine (CAM) Grant Program. The testimony closes with recommendations for implementing what has worked into system-wide reform. Strategies being implemented in Ohio to improve data collection, access to quality substance use disorder treatment, and improve collaborative practice are highlighted. 10 references. Maybe that will assist you. Yours, John E. Hudson, MSW Human Services Planner/Evaluator Social Work Division Buncombe County Health and Human Services (828) 250-5719 “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.”– HST From: bounce-121576129-69476758list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-121576129-69476758list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Robert Longo Sent: Friday, June 02, 2017 10:53 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Subject: Grandparents raising Younger Children I am working at a residential program that is considering involving more grandparents raising these children ages 0-16. Are there any articles or published studies on this topic? Rob Robert E. Longo, MRC, LPC, NCC Board Certified in Neurofeedback Serendipity Healing Arts Lexington, NC ISNR Board of Directors Web Site: www.roblongo.com E-mail: RobertLongoLPCgmail.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE ~ HIPAA Privacy Notification: This message and accompanying documents are covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521, and contain information intended for the specified individual(s) only. The privacy of information sent via email cannot be guaranteed. I encourage you to consider this fact before communicating anything to me that you would prefer to keep confidential. If you are not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this document in error and that any review, dissemination, copying, or the taking of any action based on the contents of this information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by e-mail, and delete the original message. ________________________________ This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. www.avast.com Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties by an authorized State or County official. Unauthorized disclosure of juvenile, health, legally privileged, or otherwise confidential information, including confidential information relating to an ongoing State or County procurement effort, is prohibited by law. If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and delete all records of this e-mail.



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