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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 10106
Date: 2017-01-17

Author:Jackson, Yo

Subject:Special Issue Call for Submissions - Journal of Child Abuse and Neglect - apologies for cross-posting

Call for Submissions Child Abuse & Neglect: Special Issue on Measurement of Child Maltreatment Guest Editors: Yo Jackson, Ph.D., ABPP, and Joy Gabrielli, Ph.D. Child maltreatment is an important, complex construct and the field thus far has employed a variety of approaches (i.e., self-report, case file review) in capturing the nature of child abuse and its influence on a myriad of outcomes. The majority of these approaches have focused primarily on type of abuse as the organizing paradigm for understanding maltreatment with some attention to other aspects such as severity, frequency, and chronicity of abuse exposure. Recent research, however, makes it clear that exposure to child maltreatment is more complicated than just the type of abuse, that types of abuse commonly co-occur, and that features like the frequency, severity, chronicity, age of onset, perpetrator, and overlap across types are likely important to fully understand the influence of child maltreatment on youth adjustment. For the field of child maltreatment to evolve, greater attention to how best to operationalize maltreatment is necessary. Hence, innovation is needed in both the questions we use to classify different types of maltreatment and in the methods used to analyze those questions. Over the past decade, the methods for measurement of complicated constructs have grown considerably and researchers in the field of child maltreatment have begun to use advanced statistical techniques to better understand the nature of child maltreatment. While a great deal has been learned from research on specific types of maltreatment, other facets of the construct should be considered as well, and novel statistical and methodological approaches may open the door to improve consistency of findings and allow for testing of more complicated, and potentially more accurate models of intermediate variables and developmental processes that follow maltreatment exposure. Therefore, this special issue on measurement of maltreatment is an update Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect’s special issue on measurement published in 2005 and is seeking manuscripts that include emerging approaches to measurement of maltreatment (e.g., latent measurement modeling within structural equation modeling; Item Response Theory; latent class analysis) in an effort to summarize the ways advanced statistical and creative methodological approaches can be applied within the realm of child maltreatment to advance understanding of how best to capture the varied and complex experiences of youth who have been maltreated. We encourage submissions that exemplify novel methodological and measurement approaches and those that highlight the utility of those approaches for improved understanding of the impact of child maltreatment. The special issue will serve as an update to the field from the foundational special issue on measurement in 2005. The theme of this issue might be succinctly summarized as methodological innovation in the service of conceptual clarity. Submissions will be due by April 28, 2017. Papers should be prepared in compliance with The Journal of Child Abuse and Neglect’s Instructions to Authors (https://www.elsevier.com/journals/child-abuse-and-neglect/0145-2134/guide-for-authors) and submitted through the journal website. Manuscripts will be peer reviewed. Papers that are not appropriate for inclusion in this special issue may be rerouted (with the authors’ knowledge and consent) for consideration for publication in CAN as regular papers. Please indicate in the cover letter accompanying your manuscript that you would like to have the paper considered for the Special Issue on Measurement of Child Maltreatment. Please direct all inquiries to Yo Jackson at yjackson@ku.edu Yo Jackson, Ph.D., ABPP Professor and Senior Scientist Clinical Child Psychology Program/Life Span Institute University of Kansas 1000 Sunnyside Ave., Room 2013 Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-3581

Call for Submissions Child Abuse & Neglect: Special Issue on Measurement of Child Maltreatment Guest Editors: Yo Jackson, Ph.D., ABPP, and Joy Gabrielli, Ph.D. Child maltreatment is an important, complex construct and the field thus far has employed a variety of approaches (i.e., self-report, case file review) in capturing the nature of child abuse and its influence on a myriad of outcomes. The majority of these approaches have focused primarily on type of abuse as the organizing paradigm for understanding maltreatment with some attention to other aspects such as severity, frequency, and chronicity of abuse exposure. Recent research, however, makes it clear that exposure to child maltreatment is more complicated than just the type of abuse, that types of abuse commonly co-occur, and that features like the frequency, severity, chronicity, age of onset, perpetrator, and overlap across types are likely important to fully understand the influence of child maltreatment on youth adjustment. For the field of child maltreatment to evolve, greater attention to how best to operationalize maltreatment is necessary. Hence, innovation is needed in both the questions we use to classify different types of maltreatment and in the methods used to analyze those questions. Over the past decade, the methods for measurement of complicated constructs have grown considerably and researchers in the field of child maltreatment have begun to use advanced statistical techniques to better understand the nature of child maltreatment. While a great deal has been learned from research on specific types of maltreatment, other facets of the construct should be considered as well, and novel statistical and methodological approaches may open the door to improve consistency of findings and allow for testing of more complicated, and potentially more accurate models of intermediate variables and developmental processes that follow maltreatment exposure. Therefore, this special issue on measurement of maltreatment is an update Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect’s special issue on measurement published in 2005 and is seeking manuscripts that include emerging approaches to measurement of maltreatment (e.g., latent measurement modeling within structural equation modeling; Item Response Theory; latent class analysis) in an effort to summarize the ways advanced statistical and creative methodological approaches can be applied within the realm of child maltreatment to advance understanding of how best to capture the varied and complex experiences of youth who have been maltreated. We encourage submissions that exemplify novel methodological and measurement approaches and those that highlight the utility of those approaches for improved understanding of the impact of child maltreatment. The special issue will serve as an update to the field from the foundational special issue on measurement in 2005. The theme of this issue might be succinctly summarized as methodological innovation in the service of conceptual clarity. Submissions will be due by April 28, 2017. Papers should be prepared in compliance with The Journal of Child Abuse and Neglect’s Instructions to Authors (https://www.elsevier.com/journals/child-abuse-and-neglect/0145-2134/guide-for-authors) and submitted through the journal website. Manuscripts will be peer reviewed. Papers that are not appropriate for inclusion in this special issue may be rerouted (with the authors’ knowledge and consent) for consideration for publication in CAN as regular papers. Please indicate in the cover letter accompanying your manuscript that you would like to have the paper considered for the Special Issue on Measurement of Child Maltreatment. Please direct all inquiries to Yo Jackson at yjacksonku.edu Yo Jackson, Ph.D., ABPP Professor and Senior Scientist Clinical Child Psychology Program/Life Span Institute University of Kansas 1000 Sunnyside Ave., Room 2013 Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-3581